Professional Project

Do you want a similar paper? Click here to get it from our professional writers!

Assessment 1: Project context and proposal (25%)

You will complete an individual professional project that contains a number of cumulative components, and Assessment 2 will build on the components assembled in Assessment 1.   You will be given significant feedback and feed forward during and after Assessment 1, which you must use to develop Assessment 2.

In this unit, you will demonstrate a synthesis of the knowledge, learning, business research methodologies, and professional skills that you have acquired and practiced throughout your Masters course. In particular, this unit builds upon your previous work in the unit Research in Business, however, this time you will actually do a research project.  The Professional Project will be based SOLELY on secondary sources of information. You will work independently (although within a structure) to plan, carry out and report on an investigation that addresses an issue or problem in business relevant to your future profession (this will be one of the following: marketing, accounting or management/human resource management). Throughout the term, your independent study will be supported by Moodle resources (particularly for external students) and interactions with a campus tutor/lecturer, who will provide guidance.

Assessment 1: Project context and proposal

This project plan will contain three components:

A]  A ‘field of research’ which pertains to your understanding of your profession.  This short statement will include how this field relates to the work of your profession and an industry.

B]  A source of secondary data linked to their chosen field of research.  Students will be required to either include a website with a link to a publicly available secondary data set, or a short description of how they will use publicly available sources as secondary data.

C]  A research question or questions that can be answered with the secondary data set they identified, including a clear expression of the variables you will be using, and the relationships you plan to explore.

D]  The search terms you propose to use in Google Scholar to identify literature in the field of the research question.

 

Maximum 1750 words.

For this assignment you will be asked to prepare a short literature review (up to 1500 words plus references) that places their project within the context of their profession and industry, and ends with a focused field of study or research aim, and at least one research question.  PLUS, you will be asked to clearly describe their research plan, including their proposed method of analysis.

Your assignment will be marked on the following eight criteria, with the weighting given on the rubric (see above):

    • Professional presentation and accuracy of work
    • Quality and appropriateness of references, and accuracy of referencing
    • Feasibility of project within time-frame
    • Aim and objectives/research questions
    • Preliminary critical literature review
    • Organisation of the project
    • Written communication
    • Evidence of tutor/lecturer engagement

 

For example : research topic as Impact of population growth  on transport system in NSW. But please don’t take this topic.

 

Please just focus on a few simple things.

1] Find data.

2] Look at variables.  What are they?  What do they represent?

3] Do research on variables in Google Scholar.

4] Come up with research question based on what you have found in your previous step.

5] Do the analysis…find the results…write about the results.

6] Make sure you include your research from  “3] in your literature review.”

PROPOSAL – WORKED EXAMPLE 1 (QUAL) 1 Attention: slides with a blue background show a WORKED example of how the proposal can be addressed – do note that this is only a VERY ROUGH INDICATION, not an example of how to present a proposal. We will work through this in the Webinar; without watching the Webinar, these slides will be of less use to you. Proposal example based on MY profession • Proposed title: ‘Got a PhD but how to get a lecturing job? An exploration of Australian HE recruitment practices for new business PhDs’ • Background, definition and justification of relevance to the HE teaching profession: – ‘Employment crisis’ for new PhDs (http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/05/employment-crisis-new-phds-illusion) – Knowledge about the R&S process – Crucially relevant for new PhDs wanting to join the academic workforce 2 Proposal example based on MY profession • Aim and RQs (these are NOT fully articulated): – Explore Australian HE recruitment practices for new business PhDs • What essential requirements do Australian university business schools demand of new PhD holders? • What desirable requirements do Australian university business schools wish to see in new PhD holders? • What does the recruitment and selection process look like? • Preliminary critical LR – reviewed academic/theory literature relating to: – Selection criteria: essential and desirable – Recruitment and selection processes and practices – Problems for new graduates joining the workforce 3 Proposal example based on MY profession • Project plan: – Secondary data sources: • Australian university business school job listings; 15/11/16 until 15/01/17 – SPECIFY at least some websites  this is the sampling design determining your data • Australian universities’/business schools’ vacancy sites; 15/11/16 until 15/01/17 – SPECIFY at least some websites  this is the sampling design determining your data •  Justification of the above: To explore selection criteria and information about the process – Proposed approach to analysis: • Qualitative data  qualitative analysis • Miles and Huberman (1997) Data Display and Analysis – Milestones and schedule: • Gantt chart with the main milestones 4 WHAT TO DO WITH THE DATA – WORKED EXAMPLE 1 (QUAL) 5 4 steps 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in a future Webinar) 6 IDENTIFY the data: 7 https://www.timeshighereducation.com/unijobs/listings/business-andeconomics/oceania/academic-posts/#browsing COLLECT the data: 8 • Download or screenshot the relevant material, including: THIS IS DATA!!!! COLLECT the data: 9 • Download or screenshot the relevant material, including: Do NOT contact people – public, secondary data only! COLLECT the data: 10 • Download or screenshot the relevant material, including: ANALYSE the data: 11 • Please refer to BUSN20016 and research methods textbooks for details about approaches to data analysis • We will do a LITTLE revision of this in Webinar 5 but you are expected to revise your learning from the above on your own • The next slide shows a BRIEF and SUPERFICIAL indication of how I would analyse the data once I have collected all the relevant job descriptions etc. as I had planned • More details in webinar 5 ANALYSE the data: 12 • Code the data, i.e. attach labels to chunks of data – e.g. “essential qualification”, “essential skill”, “desirable experience”, “application form” “interview”, etc. etc. etc. ANALYSE the data: 13 Code: ESSENTIAL qualification Code: DESIRABLE qualification Code: ESSENTIAL skill ANALYSE the data: 14 • Code the data, i.e. attach labels to chunks of data – e.g. “essential qualification”, “essential skill”, “desirable experience”, “application form” “interview”, etc. etc. etc. – Display codes and their relationships ANALYSE the data: 15 Code: ESSENTIAL qualification Code: DESIRABLE qualification Code: ESSENTIAL skill This is an EXAMPLE of an early display: ESSENTIALS Desirables Qualifications Skills OTHER….. ANALYSE the data: 16 • Code the data, i.e. attach labels to chunks of data – e.g. “essential qualification”, “essential skill”, “desirable experience”, “application form” “interview”, etc. etc. etc. – Display codes and their relationships • Join similar codes into broader themes – e.g. – Theme 1: Essential requirements – Theme 2: Desirable requirements – Theme 3: Initial R&S activities – Theme 4: Later R&S activities • Display themes and their relationships • Compare each theme across all observations (i.e. all job ads)  commonalities and differences • Conclude by answering the RQs ANALYSE the data: 17 • Code the data, i.e. attach labels to chunks of data – e.g. “essential qualification”, “essential skill”, “desirable experience”, “application form” “interview”, etc. etc. etc. – Display codes and their relationships • Join similar codes into broader themes – e.g. – Theme 1: Essential requirements – Theme 2: Desirable requirements – Theme 3: Initial R&S activities – Theme 4: Later R&S activities • Display themes and their relationships • Compare each theme across all observations (i.e. all job ads)  commonalities and differences • Conclude by answering the RQs ANALYSE the data: 18 Essential Qualification Desirable Qualification Address selection criteria in application? OTHER THEMES… L in MGMT at LaTrobe PhD GC education Yes L in Finance at RMIT PhD None Yes L in Innovation at CQU PhD None Yes L in MGMT at Edith Cowan PhD Qualification in education Yes ….. ANALYSE the data: 19 • Code the data, i.e. attach labels to chunks of data – e.g. “essential qualification”, “essential skill”, “desirable experience”, “application form” “interview”, etc. etc. etc. – Display codes and their relationships • Join similar codes into broader themes – e.g. – Theme 1: Essential requirements – Theme 2: Desirable requirements – Theme 3: Initial R&S activities – Theme 4: Later R&S activities • Display themes and their relationships • Compare each theme across all observations (i.e. all job ads)  commonalities and differences • Conclude by answering the RQs ANALYSE the data: 20 • What essential requirements do Australian university business schools demand of new PhD holders? – Essential qualification in ALL observed adverts: PhD – Essential skills in all permanent job adverts: teaching experience; not an essential skill for casual lecturers – Etc. ……. • What desirable requirements do Australian university business schools wish to see in new PhD holders? – Same approach as above…. • What does the recruitment and selection process look like? – The data did not provide much information about the process, other than the fact that ALL observed adverts require applicants to address selection criteria at the time when they apply. PROPOSAL – WORKED EXAMPLE 2 (QUANT) 21 Attention: slides with a blue background show a WORKED example of how the proposal can be addressed – do note that this is only a VERY ROUGH INDICATION, not an example of how to present a proposal. We will work through this in the Webinar; without watching the Webinar, these slides will be of less use to you. Proposal example based on MY profession • Proposed title: ‘Got a PhD but how to get a lecturing job? An investigating of Australian HE recruitment practices for new business PhDs’ • Background, definition and justification of relevance to the HE teaching profession: – ‘Employment crisis’ for new PhDs (http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/05/employment-crisis-new-phds-illusion) – Knowledge about the R&S process – Crucially relevant for new PhDs wanting to join the academic workforce 22 Proposal example based on MY profession • Aim and RQs (these are NOT fully articulated): – Investigate Australian HE recruitment practices for new business PhDs • What essential requirements do Australian university business schools demand of new PhD holders? • What desirable requirements do Australian university business schools wish to see in new PhD holders? • What does the recruitment and selection process look like? • Preliminary critical LR – reviewed academic/theory literature relating to: – Selection criteria: essential and desirable – Recruitment and selection processes and practices – Problems for new graduates joining the workforce 23 Proposal example based on MY profession • Project plan: – Secondary data sources: • Australian university business school job listings; 15/11/16 until 15/01/17 – SPECIFY at least some websites  this is the sampling design determining your data • Australian universities’/business schools’ vacancy sites; 15/11/16 until 15/01/17 – SPECIFY at least some websites  this is the sampling design determining your data •  Justification of the above: To explore selection criteria and information about the process – Proposed approach to analysis: • Quantitative data  quantitative analysis • Univariate analysis and descriptive statistics – Milestones and schedule: • Gantt chart with the main milestones 24 WHAT TO DO WITH THE DATA – WORKED EXAMPLE 2 (QUANT) 25 4 (5) steps 0. Establish measures of variables 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in a future Webinar) 26 E.g.: • PhD required – Yes (1) or No (0)? • Teaching experience required? – None (0); some (1); extensive (2); etc. 4 (5) steps 0. Establish measures of variables 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in a future Webinar) 27 See QUAL example 4 (5) steps 0. Establish measures of variables 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in a future Webinar) 28 Build a database; code the data and enter it (This may mean ‘re-coding’ existing databases OR you can use existing DBs as they are!) 29 4 (5) steps 0. Establish measures of variables 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in a future Webinar) 30 Analyse the QUANT data • E.g. Descriptive statistics 31 84% 16% PhD requirements PhD essential YES PhD essential NO Analyse the QUANT data • E.g. Hypothesis testing H1: All lecturing positions require PhDs as an essential criterion 32 Revise BUSN20016 for further detail about hypothesis testing. Analyse the QUANT data • E.g. Multivariate analyses • For instance: Correlation between ‘PhD required’ and ‘teaching experience required’ 33 Revise BUSN20016 for further detail about Multivariate analyses. 4 (5) steps 0. Establish measures of variables 1. IDENTIFY the data 2. COLLECT the data 3. ANALYSE the data 4. WRITE up (we will cover this in more detail in a future Webinar) 34 Write up • What essential requirements do Australian university business schools demand of new PhD holders? – 84% of observes positions require a PhD as an essential qualification – H1 was rejected – There is a clear correlation between PhD as a requirement and teaching experience as a requirement. – Etc. ……. • What desirable requirements do Australian university business schools wish to see in new PhD holders? – Same approach as above…. • What does the recruitment and selection process look like? – 100% of job adverts failed to provide details about the R&S process, other than the importance of addressing the selection criteria, which 96% of adverts specified 35

Do you want a similar paper? Click here to get it from our professional writers!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *