Case Study

NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan Assessment Task 2 NSB105 – Assessment Task 2 Page 2 of 6 NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan Assessment Task 2 Assessment name: Health Promotion Case Study Report Learning outcomes measured: 1. Explain and discuss key concepts and issues in relation to health and illness across the lifespan including the influence of social determinants of health 2. Identify the principles of partnerships with consumers in health care and demonstrate application of these principles to person-centred care across the lifespan 3. Apply knowledge of professional, ethical, social and cultural dimensions of communication to establish and maintain therapeutic relationships and partnerships in health care 4. Analyse the principles of health promotion and evaluate health promotion strategies in relation to a selected health problem and key social determinants of health across the lifespan. Length: 1500 words and a short 1 – 2 minute video Estimated time to complete task: 30 hours Weighting: 60% Individual/Group: Individual Formative/Summative: Summative How will I be assessed: 7 point grading scale using a rubric Due date: Week 13 – 4pm Friday 27th October Submitted via Turnitin in your NSB105 Blackboard site by 4 pm. More information about Turnitin is available on the FAQs about Turnitin page. Presentation requirements: This assessment task must:  Represent the individual work of the student  Use QUT APA referencing for citing academic literature  Be submitted in electronic format as a PDF document via Turnitin. Task description: You will prepare a 1500 word report and a short 1 – 2 minute video based on the following case study: Jan is a 40 year old women who lives in a rural Queensland town. Jan is a single parent of two children aged 13 and 15. Jan is having a difficult time at the moment, she recently separated from her husband and she also lost her job when the small retail business she NSB105 – Assessment Task 2 Page 3 of 6 NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan worked for closed. She is currently on unemployment benefits and money is very tight. Jan also worries about her health, she has a family history of heart disease and knows she could be healthier. She quite likes walking for exercise but finds it hard to stick to a routine. Jan enjoys cooking, likes to add extra salt to food and enjoys drinking 4-5 full-sugar Cola drinks each day. Jan feels quite stressed with her situation and her GP, Dr Forrest, has noticed her blood pressure is a bit high. Dr Forrest has referred Jan to the local Community Health Centre Nurse for some additional support to assist Jan to reduce her risk factors for heart disease. Imagine you are the Community Nurse who meets with Jan. Listen to the video where Jan introduces herself and discusses her social situation and health concerns. A video of Jan will be available in the Assessment 2 Folder in BB at the commencement of Week 8. What you need to do: Part A (1500 words) In relation to Jan’s case, write a short report that addresses the following points : 1. Provide a short written introduction to the report (150 words) 2. Outline the impact of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australian women (300 words) 3. Briefly describe the social determinants that increase Jan’s risk of CVD (300 words) 4. Briefly describe the behavioural determinants that increase Jan’s risk of CVD (300 words) 5. Outline the motivational interviewing principles you will apply when discussing CVD risk factors with Jan (300 words) 6. Write a short summary and conclusion to finish your report (150 words) 7. Provide a Reference List (Minimum of 10 relevant and contemporary references, QUT APA format) Part B (1 – 2 minute video) 8. Listen to the video of Jan (available on Assessment 2 Folder of BB site from commencement of Week 8) 9. Prepare a short 1 – 2 minute video recording of your response to Jan. In this response, you are required to demonstrate basic motivational interviewing skills to establish rapport and initiate discussion about one of Jan’s health concerns: NSB105 – Assessment Task 2 Page 4 of 6 NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan  Introduce yourself (Engage)  Briefly explain your approach to the discussion (PACE)  Demonstrate communication skills (OARS), including Affirmation, Reflection and Summarising to respond to Jan. Note: Record your video on any mobile device, upload the video to your YouTube channel (select unlisted). Generate a QR code and copy this onto your Assignment Cover Sheet 10. Upload the written report including the embedded QR code link to Turnitin by the due date. Resources needed to complete task:  In order to be successful in this task it is highly recommended that you attend scheduled lectures and tutorials, that will help prepare you to complete this assessment task  You will also need to undertake some independent study and reading about cardiovascular disease in Australia  In relation to points 2 to 5 above, you will need to draw on good quality, recent scientific literature and provide references to support your writing  Suggested references may include: Australian Institute for Health and Welfare (AIHW), Australia’s Health, National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) literature, Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data/reports, Heart Foundation guidelines for health professionals, recent research eg. systematic reviews etc. to evidence your writing.  Instructions for creating a YouTube channel  Instructions for generating QR code and embedding on Cover Sheet  QUT Cite|Write APA guide.  Turnitin Tip Sheets. Academic Integrity The School of Nursing takes academic integrity very seriously. All work submitted must be your own work. The work of others correctly acknowledged and referenced according to the APA guidelines. There are serious consequences that will be imposed should you be found to breach academic integrity. Make sure you are familiar with the MOPP C/5.3 Academic Integrity and view the Academic Integrity video and explore the Academic Case Studies available on your Blackboard site. Maintaining academic integrity is your responsibility. If in doubt, check it carefully. NSB105 – Assessment Task 2 Page 5 of 6 NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan Assessment Task 2 Rubric Name: Learning outcomes assessed: 1, 2, 3 and 4 Weighting: 60% Criteria 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Part A Knowledge of health problem (40%) Demonstrates excellent knowledge of health problem including all social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study Demonstrates good knowledge of health problem including most of the social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study Demonstratessound knowledge of health problem including the important social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study Demonstrates basic knowledge of health problem including some of the social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study, although some gaps in understanding evident Demonstrates limited knowledge of health problem including social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study Demonstrates no knowledge of health problem/social determinants and behavioural determinants relevant to the case study No evidence of meeting this criterion. Knowledge of communication principles (10%) Comprehensive understanding of therapeutic communication principles, including active listening and motivational interviewing evident Good understanding of therapeutic communication principles, including active listening and motivational interviewing evident Sound understanding of therapeutic communication principles, including active listening and motivational interviewing evident Demonstrates basic knowledge of therapeutic communication principles, with some gaps in understanding evident Demonstrates limited knowledge of therapeutic communication principles relevant to the case study, with significant gaps in understanding evident Demonstrates inaccurate knowledge of therapeutic communication principles relevant to the case study No evidence of meeting this criterion Part B Communication skills – video role play (30%) Demonstrates excellent person centered, empathic communication skills (Consistent use of eye contact, clear voice, appropriate choice of words, affirmation, reflection and summarizing evident) Demonstrates good person centered, empathic communication skills (Mostly consistent use of eye contact, clear voice clear, appropriate choice of words, affirmation, reflection and summarizing evident evident) Demonstrates sound person centered, empathic communication skills (Use of eye contact, clear voice, appropriate choice of words, affirmation, reflection and summarizing evident) Demonstrates basic person centered, empathic communication skills (Some use of eye contact, clear voice, appropriate choice of words, affirmation, reflecting and summarizing somewhat evident but could be better developed) Demonstrates communication skills that are poorly developed/ not empathic or person centered (Lack of eye contact/ voice unclear or inaudible/inappropriat e choice of words/ lack of affirmation, reflection and summarizing skills evident) Did not meet requirements of set task No evidence of meeting this criterion. NSB105 – Assessment Task 2 Page 6 of 6 NSB105 Wellness across the lifespan Academic writing (10%) Excellent written communication skills are evident through consistent and accurate use of grammar, spelling, punctuation and nondiscriminatory language Introduction and conclusion concise and coherent Kept to word limit Good written communication skills are evident through mostly consistent and accurate use of grammar, spelling, punctuation and nondiscriminatory language Introduction and conclusion coherent Kept to word limit Sound written communication skills are evident Some minor errors in use of grammar, spelling, punctuation and nondiscriminatory language Introduction and conclusion evident Kept to word limit Basic written communication skills are evident Written expression at times lacks clarity or structure with minor consistent errors in grammar/ spelling and punctuation/use of nondiscriminatory language Introduction and conclusion evident, although could be more coherent Kept to word limit Written expression is poorly structured with major errors in grammar/spelling/ punctuation/use of nondiscriminatory language Introduction and conclusion unclear or missing Under/over word limit ± 10% Did not meet requirements of set task. Very poor presentation and academic writing requirements not followed No evidence of meeting this criterion. Use of evidence based literature and referencing (10%) Consistent use of a wide range of relevant and contemporary literature to support writing Appropriate QUT APA referencing standards consistently applied Mostly use of relevant and contemporary literature to support writing Appropriate QUT APA referencing standards mostly applied Use of some high relevant and contemporary literature to support writing Appropriate QUT APA referencing with minor errors Used literature to support writing, although could be more relevant and contemporary, or some important literature missing Appropriate QUT APA referencing with minor consistent errors Use of low quality or out of date literature Referencing does not meet QUT referencing standards Did not meet this criterion No evidence of meeting this criterion

Case Clostridium defficile on an old man. Have to write assessment and care plan regarding theree different issues and activitie of living

Case Clostridium defficile on an old man. Have to write assessment and care plan regarding theree different issues and activitie of living

-Old Harvard reference is meant to use, I will upload reference guide as well
– do not write introduction just start from body part. Assignment is 2500 word but I just need 2000 word
– there are three AOL we have to select among 4. Whatever 3 you select, please message me .
– assessment of each AOL , relate how each AOL is affected with disease condition and care plan for three different issues for each AOL are the important things to do here
– also write overview of Clostridium defficile and relate it with his case.write this before you start body part
– don’t use more than 3 web resources
– use Roper Logan Tierney model book to reference and use as much as book you can but use few Journal article
Besides this I will upload assessment details with marking criteria and reference guide. Please review marking criteria and assessment requirements properly. Message me for any query and I will also text you for future help. Thanks

Assessment 2 Assignment
Format Assignment
Due Date Thursday 26th October 2017 at 23:55
Weighting 60%
Pass mark Not applicable
Length 2500 words
 

Details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submission

Case study

You are the nurse looking after Mr James, an 82 year old male admitted to the Medical ward with Clostridium difficile (C-Diff). He currently has symptoms of watery diarrhoea, a temperature of 382 degrees Celsius abdominal pain, sudden weight loss and loss of appetite.  Mr James is also complaining of lethargy.

Instructions: Structure your assignment so that it meets the following requirements:

1. Introduction. (approx 250 words). Serves as a “map” of the essay, outlining to the reader the key points contained in the body of the work.

2. Discussion of Activities of Living (AoL’s) related to the Case Study – Maintaining a Safe Environment, Eating and Drinking, Personal Cleansing and Dressing and Elimination

Choose 3 of the four AoL’s and discuss how they have been altered for Mr James.  Your answer must include the following:

·         An overview of how the three AoL’s may be affected

·         How you would assess Mr James in relation to the three identified AoL’s. Include in your answer what care you would provide Mr James

3. Nursing Care Plan. Using the Nursing Care Plan provided identify one issue related to each AoL (3 issues in total) that has arisen from the case study. You are required to formulate a plan/goal for improving each issue, identify strategies for meeting each plan/goal and then discuss what evaluative measures will be taken to determine if each plan/ goal was met.

4. Conclusion (approx 250 words, start a new paragraph). Summarise the key points expressed in the body of the work, as well as the key learning from your research.

 

Refer to marking guide on the next page of this document

Please refer to detailed information on Submission of Assignments specific to your campus/education centre within your Subject Outline

No more than three (3) web based resources are to be used for this assessment

                                     

 

 

 

NMIH 107 Essentials of Care B

Assessment Task 2: Assignment Marking Guide

 

NAME: ………………………………………………………. STUDENT NO: …………………………….

 

 

 

 

 

Criteria

Absent  

Inadequate

 

 

Satisfactory

 

Good

 

Excellent

 

 

 

Marks

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study provide an overview of the three AoL’s and how they relate to the case study  

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-9

 

 

10-13

 

 

14-15

 

/15

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study discusses with relevant detail what assessments would be undertaken

 

 

 

0

 

 

1-7

 

 

8-13

 

 

13-17

 

 

18-20

 

/20

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study identifies and discusses relevant treatment of symptoms  

 

0

 

 

1-7

 

 

8-13

 

 

13-17

 

 

18-20

 

/20

Nursing Care Plan identifies three relevant issues (one for each AOL) and discusses a plan/goal, identifies relevant strategies for meeting the goal and discusses relevant evaluative strategies for each issue

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

1-4

 

 

 

5-9

 

 

 

10-13

 

 

 

14-15

 

 

/15

 Organisation.

Assignment logically developed. Evidence of introduction, body and conclusion. Evidence of linkage and integration of information. Prescribed format used. Adheres to the word limit.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

/10

Language & Style

Appropriate use of language. Technical terms explained where necessary. Range of vocabulary.

It catches the reader’s attention and promotes the           conveying of information. Objective and authentic writing  style.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

 

/10

Presentation.

Syntax, grammar, punctuation and spelling are correct. Legible presentation. Referencing as per Assessment Handbook.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

/10

             
 
 

This assignment is worth 60% of the total assessment for this subject.

/ 100
  Late Penalty (if applicable):

 

 

 Marker:

UOW HARVARD REFERENCING STYLE Why Reference? Referencing is the process of linking what you read with what you write. It is important to reference all your sources: * To enable you or someone else to find the source of your information easily * To avoid plagiarism by acknowledging that you’ve used the ideas and work of others * To strengthen your arguments and add credibility by referring to expert ideas There are several styles of referencing. The Harvard format is utilised by many universities and schools. About the Harvard style of Referencing The Harvard referencing style is also known as the author date system because of the requirement to cite both the author and publication date within in your paper. The prominence of the author and date of publication in a reference list provides a clear indication of the credibility and currency of the resources used in your research. There is no definitive version of Harvard available. The UOW style of referencing is based on the AGPS Harvard version: Style manual for authors, editors and printers 2002, 6th edn, John Wiley, Milton, Qld. The UOW Harvard Referencing Style has two main components: In-text references/citations When you refer to another author’s work in your writing you must cite your source in the body of your paper by providing the last name(s) of the author(s), the year of publication and, where applicable, page number(s). The reference list A list at the end of your assignment which includes full details of each source you have cited in your writing. Sources are listed in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. In-text Referencing There are two main ways to present in-text references, or citations: 1. Information prominent Where the focus is on the information from your source. You give prominence to the information by placing the reference at the end of your sentence in brackets. For example, “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any…” (Metcalf 2005, p. 184) “The experience of …” (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 28) 2. Author prominent Where the focus is on the author(s) of your source. You give prominence to the author by placing the reference in the body of your sentence, with the author’s name incorporated into the sentence structure and the date in brackets For example, Metcalf (2005, p. 184) claims that “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or councils of elders, no armies or law enforcement” Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 28) argue that “…” NOTES * Page Numbers Always include page numbers when you: * Quote word for word * Summarise or paraphrase an idea from a specific page or pages * Refer to tables, figures, images or present specific information like dates/statistics. * Quotation Marks The Harvard (AGPS) and Footnoting (Oxford) manual recommends using SINGLE quotation marks around any direct quote. If you use Turnitin, be sure to enclose all direct quotes in DOUBLE quotation marks because Turnitin recognises only the text enclosed in double quotation marks as a direct quote. In this Referencing and Citing Guide, all Author-Date/Harvard and Footnoting direct quote examples are presented within double quotation marks. Reference List A reference list appears in alphabetical order at the end of your work. Many people confuse the terms ‘reference list’ and ‘bibliography’. A reference list includes ONLY the sources that you have CITED/REFERENCED in the body of your work. A bibliography includes the sources you cited plus any additional resources you may have consulted in your research. This is an example of a reference list: Blair, DJ 1996, ‘Beyond the metaphor: football and war, 1914-1918’, Journal of the Australian War Memorial, no.28, viewed 15/5/2007, http://www.awm.gov.au/journal/j28/j28- blai.htm Department of Veterans’ Affairs 2006, Helpful Links to Veteran Related Sites, viewed 10/8/2006, http://www.dva.gov.au/contacts/site.htm Dolnicar, S, Crouch, GI & Long, P 2008, ‘Environment-friendly tourists: what do we really know about them?’, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, vol.16, no.2, pp. 197-210. Dolnicar, S & Hurliman, A 2010, ‘Australians’ water conservation behaviours and attitudes’, Australian Journal of Water Resources, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 43-53. A History of Reclamation in the West 2000, History Program, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt Lake City, Utah. Malinowski, W, Larsen, AA, Ngu, B & Fairweather, S 1999, Human Geography, Routledge, New York. Preston, AC 1990a, Multivariate Analysis of Nurses’ Absence Behaviour, Business Research and Development Fund of the Confederation of Western Australian Industry, East Perth, WA. Preston, AC 1990b, Theories and Causes of Labour Absence: Reconciling the Economic and Psychology Approaches, Business Research and Development Fund of the Confederation of Western Australian Industry, East Perth, WA. Rose, DB 2002, ‘Good hunters’, in Country of the Heart: An Indigenous Australian Homeland, Aboriginal Studies Press for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, pp. 77- 113. NOTES 1. Always check with your academic to determine what is required for your particular assignment. 2. If there are multiple works by the same author in your reference list, put the earliest date first. 3. Make sure the author details and year in the in-text citation exactly match the entry in the reference list. Format In -Text Reference Reference List BOOKS Format In-Text Reference Reference List Book review Direct quote Nadel points to Stoppard’s constant scepticism about autobiography and biography (Carroll 2002, p. 8). Paraphrasing Carroll (2002, p. 8) shows that… Carroll, S 2002, ‘The stuff of theatre’, review of Double act: a life of Tom Stoppard by Ira Nadel, Age, 28 September, Saturday Extra, p. 8. Chapter in an edited book Refer to the author of the chapter in-text. In the Reference List set out the editor’s name with initials first then family name. Put the title of the chapter in ‘single quotes’. Do not italicise. Put (ed.), for a single editor or (eds), for multiple editors followed by a comma. The pages of the chapter are added after the publication details. Direct quote Gray (2009, p. 75) concludes the following “…” Paraphrasing Another demonstration of this is… (Gray 2009, p. 75) Gray, E 2009, ‘The hair of Milton: historicism and literary history’, in DW Davies (ed.), Romanticism, history, historicism: essays on an orthodoxy, Routledge, New York, pp. 32-42. Corporate author – when the author is also the publisher …a better world (Deni Green Consulting Services 2008, p. 5). Deni Green Consulting Services 2008, Capital idea: realising value from environmental and social performance, Deni Green Consulting Services, North Carlton, Victoria. Format In-Text Reference Reference List e-Book In-text referencing and reference list entry is the same for eBooks as print. Direct quote “students taught by teachers with greater verbal ability learn more than those taught by teachers with lower verbal ability” (Stronge 2007, p. 4) Paraphrasing Stronge (2007, p. 4) notes the correlation between… Stronge, JH 2007, Qualities of effective teachers, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA. Edited Book Use the abbreviation ed. for a single editor and eds (no full stop) for more than one editor. Use the abbreviation edn (no full stop) for edition. Write ed., eds and edn in lower case not capitals. Direct quote “Human security…” (eds McGrew & Poku 2007, p. 8). “Hinduism is not defined…” (ed. Flood 2003, p. 5) Paraphrasing According to McGrew and Poku (eds 2007, p. 8)… Flood (ed. 2003, p. 5) comments that Hinduism is… McGrew, A & Poku, NK (eds) 2007, Globalization, development and human security, Polity, Cambridge, UK. Flood, G (ed.) 2003, The Blackwell companion to Hinduism, Blackwell, Oxford. Encyclopedia or dictionary (print) Use the word ‘in’ before the title of the publication. Encyclopedia entry with author Direct quote Smith, MJ 1993, ‘Anarchy’, in The Oxford Companion to the Format In-Text Reference Reference List Encyclopedia entry with no author If no author is evident and a well known source is being cited you can put all the necessary information in-text. You do not need to put this reference in the reference list. Use italics when including the title of the dictionary/encyclopedia in-text. “Anarchy refers to the absence of authoritative institutions or norms above independent sovereign states.” (Smith 1993) Paraphrasing Smith (1993) observes that anarchy places states in a permanent position of rivalry with each other. The Macquarie dictionary (2005) defines a larrikin as… or …(The New Encyclopedia Britannica 1997) Politics of the World, J Krieger (ed.), Oxford University Press, New York. Encyclopedia or dictionary (website) If you have used a dictionary or encyclopedia from a website include the viewed date and URL Direct quote The heel of Achilles is “[t]he vulnerable or weak point in a man’s character or of a nation.” (Dictionary of phrase and fable 2000) Paraphrasing The Dictionary of phrase and fable (2000) defines Achilles’ heel as… ‘Achilles tendon’ 2000, in Dictionary of phrase and fable, EC Brewer (ed.), Bartelby.com, viewed 30 November 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Encyclopedia or dictionary (online database) If the online encyclopedia is from a library reference database e.g. Gale Virtual Reference or Oxford Reference Online, cite it the same as the print. Do not include the date viewed, the database name or the URL. Direct quote “Descent systems determine…” (Velioti-Georgopoulos 2006). Paraphrasing Velioti-Georgopoulos (2006) emphasises that kinship and descent should be treated as different concepts. Velioti-Georgopoulos, M 2006 ‘Kinship and Descent’, in Encyclopedia of Anthropology, HJ Birx (ed.), vol. 3, Sage Reference, Thousand Oaks, CA. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Multiple authors – Two or three Cite the names of the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the book. Unlike the reference list which requires author/s initials, in-text references use author/s surnames only and do not include initials. When referring to multiple authors in a sentence use ‘and’ instead of ‘&’. When citing the names of multiple authors in brackets use ‘&’ before the last author. Direct quote “The experience of …” (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 28) or Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 28) argue that “…” Paraphrasing The migrant experience is one that… (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p.28) Savage, M, Bagnall, G & Longhurst, B 2005, Globalization and belonging, SAGE, London. Multiple authors – More than three authors For in-text citations, list the name of the first author followed by et al. (meaning ‘and others’). Do not use et al. in the reference list. List all the authors. Direct quote Kring et al. (2010, p. 72) outline the theory as “…” or “The theory…” (Kring et al. 2010, p. 72) Paraphrasing Abnormal is not always…(Kring et al. 2010, pp. 47-48) Kring, A, Davison, GC, Neale, JM & Johnson, S 2010, Abnormal psychology, 11th edn, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ. Multiple works by same author Format In-Text Reference Reference List Same author different years Arrange the in-text citation in chronological order starting with the earliest date first. Use a semicolon to separate the page reference from the date following it. In the reference list begin with the earliest date first. The name of the author can be repeated but it is preferable to use the em dash — with no space before the date. Same author same year Distinguish between the titles in-text by adding a lower case letter of the alphabet starting with ‘a’. In the reference list place the lower case letter after the date with no space. Dyer (2009; 2013) reported that leadership and communication… or Leadership and communication are…. (Dyer 2009, p. 223; 2013, p. 149) “In the last 10 years Australia has experienced…” (Manne 2005a, p. 1) Manne (2005b, p. 14) argued that the corporate media power… Dyer, J 2009, The business communication handbook, 8th edn, Pearson, Frenchs Forest, NSW. —2013, Communication for business and the professions: strategies and skills, 5th edn, Pearson, Frenchs Forest, NSW. Manne, R (ed.) 2005a, Do not disturb: is the media failing Australia?, Black Inc., Melbourne. — 2005b, Left right left: political essays 1977-2005, Black Inc., Melbourne. No author or editor List the item alphabetically in the reference list by the title then date. Do not use Anon or Anonymous. Italicise the title in the In-text citation as well as in the Reference List Cite the work by its title and date. Direct quote “Ant behaviour patterns …” (The life of insects 1979, p. 23) Paraphrasing The life of insects 1979, Silver Burdett Co., Morristown, NJ. Format In-Text Reference Reference List In The life of insects (1979, p. 23) it is claimed that… Format In-Text Reference Reference List No date of publication If there is no date use n.d. If there is an approximate date use c. (this means ‘circa’ – Latin for ‘around/about’). This is emphasised by Seah (n.d.) when… This is emphasised by Seah (c. 2005) when… Seah, R n.d., Micro-computer applications, Microsoft Press, Redmond, Washington. Seah, R c.2005, Micro-computer applications, Microsoft Press, Redmond, Washington. Second or later edition Any edition other than the first edition must be included in the reference list citation. The edition statement is added after the title, followed by a comma. A reprint is not a new edition. It does not need a specific mention. Use the abbreviation edn (no full stop) for edition. Direct quote “Student centred learning…” (Killen 2009, p. 10) Paraphrasing Effective teaching is based on several… (Killen 2009, p. 10) Killen, R 2009, Effective teaching strategies: lessons from research and practice, 5th edn, Cengage Learning, South Melbourne. Secondary sources This is where the work of one author is cited in another author’s work For the in-text citation you might write: As the cultural critic Norman Klein stated in 1997, “the Romantics gloried in the ruins of memory” (cited in Cameron 2008, p. 5) In the Reference List you only need to record the book that you actually sourced: Cameron, A 2008, Modular Narratives in Contemporary Cinema, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, New York. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Single author – Paraphrasing Metcalf (2005, p. 184) propounded the idea that… Metcalf, P 2005, Anthropology: the basics, Routledge, Abingdon. Single author – when fewer than 30 words are quoted Include the quote within the paragraph and include specific page number/s. Use quotation marks to show the exact words. Metcalf (2005, p. 184) argues that “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or councils of elders, no armies or law enforcement” Metcalf, P 2005, Anthropology: the basics, Routledge, Abingdon. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Single author – when 30 or more words are quoted Begin quoting the material on a new line. Indent it 5 spaces (use the Indent tool to keep all lines of the quote evenly indented). Include specific page number/s. Also, always include the page number(s) when drawing primarily on a particular page or section rather than referring to the source as a whole. In-text use p. for a single page (Metcalf 2005, p. 45) and pp. for a page range e.g. (Metcalf 2005, pp. 34-36). Omit quotation marks. Use double spacing for your text and single spacing for the intended quote. Make sure the quote is exactly as it was published. Much has been written about acute care. Finkelman (2006, p. 184), for example, points out that: There are many changes in acute care services occurring almost daily, and due to the increasing use of outpatient surgery, surgical services have experienced major changes. Hospitals are increasing the size of their outpatient or ambulatory surgery departments and adjusting to the need of moving patients into and out of the surgical service in 1 day or even a few hours. Recently, this trend has been seen in some Australian hospitals and research here… Finkelman, AW 2006, Leadership and management in nursing, Pearson Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Translated work Format In-Text Reference Reference List When the role of a translator, compiler, or reviser, is acknowledged, the initials precede the surname. This format also applies to compilers, editors and revisers. Use the abbreviations rev., trans., ed./eds or comp./comps appropriate. Direct quote Cite the author, not the translator of the book in the in-text citation “Morality…” (Nietzsche 1956, p. 27) Paraphrasing Nietzsche (1956, p. 27) argues that… Give acknowledgement to the translator after the title: Nietzsche, FW 1956, The birth of tragedy: and, The genealogy of morals, trans. F Golffing, Doubleday, Garden City, New York. Format In-Text Reference Reference List JOURNAL, NEWSPAPER & NEWSLETTER ARTICLES Journal articles Capitalise all main words in the Journal Title (not ‘and’ ‘of’ ‘in’ etc.). The title of the article is in quotes. The title of the journal is in italics. Author, initial(s) Year of publication, ‘Article title’, Journal Title, vol. (volume number), no. (issue number if any), p./pp. (page number/range). Journal article with one author Direct quote Lee (2007, p. 157) draws on data collected from “…” Paraphrasing The ongoing need for remittances…(Lee 2007, p. 160) Lee, H 2007, ‘Transforming transnationalism: second generation Tongans overseas’, Asian and Pacific Migration Journal, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 157-178. Journal article with two or three authors Format In-Text Reference Reference List Cite the names of the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the article. When the authors names are incorporated into your text, use ‘and’ instead of ‘&’. If the names of the authors are in brackets use ‘&’ before the last author. Direct quote Carlin and Ford (2006, p. 79) claim that, “paying executives in the form of options…”. or “A further noteworthy influence…” (Carlin & Ford 2006, p. 79). Paraphrasing The group of 100 joined the ASX and other associations… (Carlin & Ford 2006, p. 79). Carlin, TY & Ford, G 2006, ‘A governance perspective on executive options plans – some Australian empirical evidence’, Australian Accounting Review, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 75-84. Journal article with more than three authors In-Text List the name of the first author followed by et al. (meaning ‘and others’) Reference list List all authors. Do not use ‘et al.’ Enter the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the article. Direct quote Wattal et al. conclude that, “[p]olitics in the United States has come a long way…” (2010, p. 670). or “We believe information systems can provide insight into…” (Wattal et al. 2010, p. 670). Paraphrasing The candidates site “stickiness” is not determined by popularity (Wattal et al. 2010, p. 670). Wattal, S, Schuff, D, Mandviwalla, M & Williams, CB 2010, ‘Web 2.0 and politics: the 2008 U.S. presidential election and an epolitics research agenda’, MIS Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 669- 688. Journal article with no volume or issue number Format In-Text Reference Reference List An interesting approach to scam (Wychick & Thompson 2005) suggests that… Wychick, J & Thompson, L 2005, ‘Fallen for a scam lately?’ Australia Today, 24 November, pp54-60. Journal article with no author Use the ‘title of the article’ in place of the author in-text Put the ‘title of the article’ in single quotes List the article alphabetically by its title in the reference list. Direct quote “During his campaign Obama…”(‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ 2010, p. 45) Paraphrasing In the article ‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ (2010, p. 45) the author laments… ‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ 2010, The Lancet, vol. 376, Iss. 9747, p. 1118. Journal article retrieved from the Internet Follow this example if the journal article is only available via the internet. Enclose the URL in the ‘greater than’ ‘less than’ symbols < >. Put what journal details are available after the title. Volume and issue nos. may not always available. If there is no author use the ‘title of the article’ in place of the author in-text. Direct quote Findings suggest that “[i]ntercultural communication skills… in ELT” (Xiao & Petraki 2007) Paraphrasing Xiao and Petraki (2007) establish in their study that… Xiao, H & Petraki E 2007, ‘An Investigation of Chinese students’ difficulties in intercultural communication and its role in ELT’, Journal of Intercultural Communication, no. 13, viewed 27 November 2010, Secondary sources Format In-Text Reference Reference List Where the work of one author is cited in another author’s work For in-text citations: Fong’s 1987 study (cited in Betram 1996, p. 9) found that memory … In the Reference List record only the journal you actually sourced i.e. Bertram reference. Journal articles retrieved from a database If an article is accessed using a library database e.g. Proquest or Expanded Academic, cite it the same as the print article. Do not include the date viewed, database name or URL. Direct quote Carlin and Ford (2006, p. 79) observe that, “paying executives in the form of options…”. Or “A further noteworthy influence…” (Carlin & Ford, 2006, p. 79). Paraphrasing The group of 100 joined the ASX and other associations… (Carlin & Ford, 2006, p. 79). Carlin, TY & Ford, G 2006, ‘A governance perspective on executive options plans – some Australian empirical evidence’, Australian Accounting Review, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 75-84. Journal articles retrieved from a database (no author) See entry for Journal article with no author In-text Referencing Newspaper articles Format In-Text Reference Reference List Newspaper title is in italics. Leave out ‘The’ in the title. Use Australian or Sydney Morning Herald. Newspaper article – with author/s Newspaper headline is the article title in single quotes. Include the date of issue (day month) of the newspaper after the title. Include the page number of the article in the Reference list. Do not include page numbers in the in-text reference. Direct quote “In a break with tradition, the Prime Minister’s office supplied video footage of the visit taken…” (Crowe 2015). Paraphrasing Crowe (2015) compares inclusion of media teams to Tony Abbott’s visit to Baghdad with previous prime ministerial visits to Iraq and Afghanistan. Crowe, D 2015, ‘ Anger as media left grounded’, Australian, 06 January, p. 4. Newspaper article – with no author If the author is not evident provide all the details in the in-text citation including the page nos. Direct quote “A British Ministry of Defence spokesman confirmed…” (Australian 12 November 2010, p. 14). Paraphrasing The report in the Australian (12 November 2010, p. 14) remarked that Breaker Morant… Not required as all details are provided in-text Format In-Text Reference Reference List Newspaper article retrieved from a database Reference a newspaper article from a database e.g. Factiva or ProQuest in exactly the same way as you would a newspaper article in print. There is no need to acknowledge which database the article came from. See either the examples for Newspaper article with author or without author. Online newspaper or newsletter article Add the URL and date viewed for articles found on a Newspaper webpage. Direct quote “China, for instance, is targeting…over 15 years” (Gittens 2010). Paraphrasing Gittens (2010) accuses Australia of being behind other countries efforts to reduce carbon. Gittins, R 2010, ‘Suits us to be deluded on climate,’ The Age, 17 November, viewed 6 December, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS ABS Statistics Abbreviate publisher to ABS. Author will always be Australian Bureau of Statistics. Place of publication for printed statistics is always Canberra. Year of publication is the year it is released not the date in the title. Include the Catalogue number preceded by cat. no. (the number is part of the title on ABS publications). Direct quote “The number of divorces has been decreasing each year after reaching a peak in 2001” (ABS 2008). Paraphrasing According the Australian Bureau of Statistics (2008) the median length of a marriage to separation is approximately 9 years. Print Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, ABS, Canberra. Online Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, viewed 17 January 2011, . Government Department as Author/s Format In-Text Reference Reference List It is common when referencing government publications to have the same group author and publisher. In the reference list put in entries for both the full group author name and the abbreviated name. If a committee has prepared the report for a government department or agency use the committee name as the author, and the government department as the publisher. “According to the International Atomic Energy Agency… unauthorised movements of nuclear material” (Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 2005, p. 12). Long group author names If the group author name is long and cited frequently abbreviate the name in the in-text citation e.g. “International community has had success….renounce nuclear weapons” (DFAT 2010, p. 14). Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 2005, Weapons of mass destruction Australia’s role in fighting proliferation : practical responses to new challenges, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Canberra. DFAT – see Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Government Report (print or online) Often the author and the publisher are the same in Government publications. Abbreviate long group names if being referred to often. Put both the abbreviated and full form of the group author in the reference list. PDF documents look like the printed document and should contain all the publication details. Often online reports are the same as print, just add the date accessed and the URL after the publication details. Direct quote “Between 1887 and 1954 private welfare agencies and individuals were authorised to apprehend children” (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 1997, p. 55). “Eight events remain significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a mother experiencing high distress they are…” (Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009, p. 36). Paraphrasing In the Bringing them home report it highlights the strategy of permanently retaining children who were placed temporarily in respite accommodation (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 1997, p. 55). Print Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 1997, Bringing them home: report of the national inquiry into the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Sydney. Online Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009, Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: 2008–09 Annual Report, FaHCSIA, Canberra, viewed 12 December 2010, . FaHCSIA see Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Stress is a key factor contributing to poorer outcomes for mother and infant (FaHCSIA 2009, p. 36) Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) print or online Parliamentary debates are referenced using the Jurisdiction (eg. Australia or New South Wales) followed by the Chamber (eg. House of Representatives or Senate for Commonwealth, and Legislative Assembly or Legislative Council for NSW) The title Debates is always in italics. The volume number may not be available in the online versions. Direct quote The then Minister for Health, John Thwaites (Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000, p. 2145) reveals that “The National and Victorian Drug Household Survey indicate…” The Prime Minister, Mr Howard predicted that “in the foreseeable future nuclear power…fossil fuel” (Australia, House of Representatives 2006, p. 41). Paraphrasing Thwaites outlined the Government’s plan for safe injecting facilities in the Second Reading Speech… (Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000 pp. 2144-2149). The Prime Minister Mr Howard (Australia, House of Representatives 2006, p.40) outlined his defence for the government’s failure to sign… Print Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000, Debates, vol. 447, pp. 2144- 2149. Online Australia, House of Representatives 2006, Debates, viewed 12 December 2010, . Parliamentary Paper A reference to a Commonwealth Parliamentary paper would begin Australia, Parliament… If a Commissioner or Chairperson is mentioned their name goes after the title Direct quote In the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission it was acknowledged that “underground cable essentially eliminates bushfire risk associated with the provision of electricity” (Victoria, Parliament 2010, p.154). Victoria, Parliament 2010, 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission, (B. Teague, Chairperson) Parl. Paper 332, vol. 2, The Commission, Melbourne. Format In -Text Reference Reference List in round brackets. Format In-Text Reference Reference List LEGAL PUBLICATIONS Legal Cases The following details are required for intext and reference citations: * the name of the case * the year or volume number, or both * the page on which the report of the case begins The name of the case is italicised. The year is enclosed in parentheses. Square brackets are used when there is no volume number and the year is an integral part of the title, i.e. square brackets indicate that the year of publication is the volume number. If you are referring to a particular page of the judgment, include a ‘pinpoint reference’ to the actual page in the in-text citation. Use the word ‘at’ instead of p. Do not include URLs for cases found online. Direct quote The judge in R v Ramage (2004) VSC 508 stated the “The Court cannot allow…” Paraphrasing In the case of Mabo v. Queensland (no. 2) (1992) 175 CLR1, it was… The case, Jones v. Sherlock (2009) NSWSC 246 showed that… In Northern Sandblasting Pty Ltd v. Harris (1997) 188 CLR 313 at 334 the High Court held that the landlord was in breach of a contractual duty of care owed to the tenants and to their family. R v. Ramage (2004) VSC 508 Chappel v Hart [1998] HCA 55 Mabo v. Queensland (no. 2) (1992) 175 CLR1. Jones v. Sherlock (2009) NSWSC 246. Northern Sandblasting Pty Ltd v. Harris (1997) 188 CLR 313. Legislation Format In-Text Reference Reference List Legislation should be referenced as if in print even if viewed electronically Acts Most legislation has a short formal title that can be used for citation purposes. The first in-text reference to an Act or Ordinance should cite the short formal title, in italics, exactly and in full. In subsequent references the title can be shown in roman type without the date. Do not place a comma between the title and the year. If the name of the legislation begins with an article (eg. a, an, the) do not omit the article in the citation. Bills Bills before parliament are ‘unpublished’ and should be cited in roman type not italics. First in-text reference: In relation to action regarding unsuitable goods, s. 74B of the Trade Practices Act 1974 states… Subsequent in-text reference/s: According to the Trade Practices Act… Example of an act beginning with an article: The Commonwealth’s A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999 makes provision for… In the Companion Animals Amendment Bill 2006 (NSW) there is provision for…. Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cwlth). Companion Animals Amendment Bill 2006 (NSW). Patents & Standards Format In-Text Reference Reference List Patents For patents the title may be more of a descriptive title rather than a formal title Identifying elements such as patent numbers should be included If no individual author is available, a corporate author can be used in the in-text reference. Standards For standards not retrieved from an electronic database, replace online database information with publisher information. Paraphrase The particle trap design is… (Cookson 1985) Direct quote The rule from Standards Australia (2009, p. 23) is: “[a]n adhesive label…” Paraphrase …stated that glass in buildings must be… (Standards Australia Online 2006) Cookson, AH 1985, Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems, US Patent 4554399. Mccallum, JM 2008, Method for and composition of excipient suitable for use in herbal formulations and formulations derived therefrom, Australian Patent AU 2008100919, viewed 8 December 2008, SciFinder Scholar. Standards Australia 2009, LP Gas fuel vessels for automotive use, AS/NZS 3509:2009, Standards Australia, Sydney. Standards Australia Online 2006, Glass in buildings: selection and installations, AS 1288-2006, amended 31 January 2008, viewed 19 May 2009, SAI Global Database Format In-Text Reference Reference List WEB RESOURCES Blogs If no proper name is given, the author’s username may be used instead. If the author puts multiple posts up on the same day, include the time the entry was posted.- e.g. 12 November 13:53. If you are referencing a comment from a weblog, use the name of the commenter instead of the author of the weblog post and use ‘weblog comment’ instead of ‘web log post’ for format. Include the exact title (Including ‘Re:’ if used). If you are using the whole blog and not an individual post, do not include the Blog Post Title and change the format to weblog. Direct quote “The whole idea of a conspiracy is that it takes two or more people conspiring” (Henderson 2010). …as Henderson questions, “[t]he whole idea of a conspiracy…” (2010). Paraphrasing Henderson’s weblog post (2010) covers how the meaning of the word conspiracy has changed to mean self-dealing. Henderson, D 2010, Has the word ‘conspiracy’ lost its meaning?, Library of Economics and Liberty, weblog post, 13 December, viewed 21 December 2010, Document from a Website If there is no author begin the reference with the title of the document. Include page numbers in-text if it is a long document. Use n.d. if there is no date. Direct quote “Following the intensification of the GFC…weaken markedly” (Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry 2010, p. 5). Paraphrasing Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry 2010, Issues Paper Youth Employment, Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, viewed 15 December 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2010) found that more Australian youth are unable to find work in 2010 than in 2008. Podcast / Vodcast If the podcast has no recognisable author, start with the title and put the year after the title. Use the title in the in-text referencing. Direct quote ….”while the octopus was carrying the coconut, it was actually of no benefit to it”, Julian Finn explains on the La Trobe University Podcast (2010). Paraphrasing This podcast show is about who owns the fish and the ocean (The War on Fish 2010). Finn, J & Norman, M 2010, Have coconut, will travel, vodcast, 23 April, La Trobe University, viewed 10 January 2011, . The war on fish 2010, podcast, 9 July, La Trobe University, viewed 10 January 2011, . Social Media (Twitter, Facebook etc.) Before using a reference from Twitter or Facebook make sure it is appropriate for academic work. If no proper name is given, use the username. As tweets and status updates do not have Direct quote The BP Parody account created on Twitter, notes “[c]atastrophe is a strong word, let’s all agree to call it a whoopsie daisy”. (BP Public Relations 2010). Paraphrasing BP Public Relations 2010, ‘Catastrophe is a strong…’, BPGlobalPR, Twitter, 24 May, viewed 10 January 2011, . Office of the Prime Minister 2011, ‘Prime Minister Gillard today announced…’, Julia Gillard, Facebook, 13 January, viewed 20 January 2011, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List titles, use the first few words of the message as a title. The Office of The Prime Minister (2010), updated their Julia Gillard Facebook page on 13 Jan, with… Webpage If there is no author or organisation name begin the reference with the title of the webpage. Direct quote “The risk threshold for entry to the Gateway Review Process is high risk” (Department of Finance and Deregulation 2010). Paraphrasing According to the Department of Finance and Deregulation, the Gateway process… (2010). The Gateway Review Process 2010, Department of Finance and Deregulation, viewed 10 December 2010, . Online video Direct quote “Googling is great and everybody does it but not for university assignments” (LTULibrary 2010). Paraphrasing This video shows why you shouldn’t just use Google when researching for university assignments (LTULibrary 2010). The CSIRO YouTube video (2009) reveals … LTULibrary 2010, Why can’t I just google?, online video, 9 February, La Trobe University, viewed 20 January 2011, . CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) 2009, Making a difference, online video, 25 May, CSIRO, Viewed December 9, 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Format In-Text Reference Reference List OTHER SOURCES Conference Papers Published If the conference paper is available online add the viewed date and URL after the place of publication. The title of the conference is put in italics. Unpublished If the paper is not published the title of the conference is not in Italics. Use the phrase paper presented at after the title of the paper and before the title of the conference. Put the dates of the conference (range of days and month) after the place. Direct quote ‘To engage productively with assessment tasks…’ (Kift & Moody 2009). Paraphrasing Kift and Moody (2009) observe that first year students require an induction to academic conventions to engage with assessment. Direct quote “Students are more likely to persist and graduate in settings that hold…” (Tinto 2009). Paraphrasing Tinto (2009) identifies his four main conditions for student retention as… Kift, S M, & Moody, KE 2009, ‘Harnessing assessment and feedback in the first year to support learning success, engagement and retention’, in ATN Assessment Conference 2009 Proceedings, RMIT University, Melbourne, 19 – 20 November, viewed 8 November 2010, . Tinto, V 2009, ‘Taking the student retention seriously: rethinking the first year at university’, paper presented at the FYE Curriculum Design Symposium, Queensland University of Technology, 5-6 February, viewed 12 December 2010, Course Material Format In-Text Reference Reference List State the type of course material after the title of the lecture. You can use the subject code or the subject name. Course material is unpublished so the title is enclosed in single quotes not italics. Direct quote “Socialisation into roles is a major impetus behind inequality” (Wallace 2010). Paraphrasing It was pointed out in the week 2 lecture that kinship… (Lee 2010) Wallace, P 2010, ‘Gender & sexuality’ PowerPoint slides, SOC1SAC, La Trobe University, viewed 19 January 2011. Lee, H 2010, ‘Charting Kinship’, lecture, ANT2KAM, La Trobe University, delivered 5 August. Figure / Graph / Table Any reproduced table, figure or graph must reference the original author and copyright holder. In the reference list, reference the source where the graph or table is located. The graph Divorces granted: Australia 1988 – 2007 (ABS 2008) illustrates… Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, ABS, Canberra. Film, Video & Television Format In-Text Reference Reference List Film & Video The in-text references to films DVDs, videos, television, and radio programs should contain the title (in italics) and date of production. The key elements of a film or audiovisual reference are: * Title (in italics) * Year of publication or release * Format (use motion picture for films; use video recording, CD-ROM, DVD, audio cassette, slide, or microform etc. for other audiovisual material) * Distributor (for films) or publisher * Place of recording or publication (for audiovisual material) Although you are likely to view most feature films (i.e. movies) as DVDs, you should still reference feature films with the format ‘motion picture’ rather than ‘DVD’. Any special credits and other information that may be useful can be noted after the citation e.g. Revolutionary road 2009, DVD, Paramount Home Entertainment Australia, Abbotsford Vic., starring Leonardo Di Caprio and Kate Winslet. Television Place the Title in italics, and date of …….as portrayed in About Jenny Holzer (2011) The scene, towards the end of the film, depicts… (Alien Underworld 2002) Woody Allen in Annie Hall (1977) demonstrates the art of… A recent Four Corners episode highlighted the difficulties of About Jenny Holzer 2011, DVD, Microcinema International, San Francisco, California. Alien Underworld 2002, video recording, Tattooed Media and the Australian Film Finance Corporation, Australia, written & directed by Sonya Pemberton. Annie Hall 1977, motion picture, MGM Home Entertainment, Santa Monica CA, directed by Woody Allen. Breaking Point, Four Corners 2010, television program, Australian Format In-Text Reference Reference List recording in the in-text citation. If the program is part of a series put the episode title first followed by the series title both in italics. Add the broadcast date after the publication details. caring for disabled family members (Breaking Point 2010). When interviewed on 7.30 Report (2015) the Treasurer said … It could be argued that the financial situation at the time necessitated…. (What are we going to do with the money? 1997) Broadcasting Corporation, Australia, February 15. 7.30 Report 2015, television program, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Australia, 18 November. What are we going to do with the money? 1997, television program, Special Broadcasting Service, Australia, 8 August Images & Artwork Online When reproducing/including an image in your work, place the in-text reference immediately under the image. For the format description: use ‘Image’ for photographs or graphics. Where the image is a photograph of an artwork, and the photographer has been specifically credited, note this after the title In the image above (Jorgensen 2010) you can see… Kamuro (2008) illustrates … (Sculpture by the sea – Elephant 2009) (Van Gogh 1890) Jorgensen, L 2010, Lighthouse Freezes, image, ABC News, viewed 17 December 2010, . Kamuro (2008) Calmness, image, Flickr viewed 30 June 2010, . Sculpture by the sea – Elephant 2009, image, photographed by A. Wain, Flickr, viewed 4 February 2014, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Where the photographer or artist is not known, start your reference with the Title of Image. Where none of the usual details are known, i.e. artist/photographer, date, title of image, start with [Subject of the image]. In-Print If you are citing an image from a printed source, reference the printed source as normal and use a page number in your intext citation to indicate which page the image comes from. (Gaunt 1970, p. 17) Van Gogh, V. 1890, Undergrowth with two figures, Google Cultural Institute, viewed 4 March 2014, . Gaunt, W. 1970, The impressionists, Thames & Hudson, London. Leaflet / Pamphlet Use the authorising body/publisher as the author OR use the title of the pamphlet/leaflet if there is no author. Use the title of the pamphlet in-text if there is no author. Use n.d. for no date. Use c. if you can approximately date the document e.g. c. 1985. Use the word “pamphlet” after the title. Direct quote “…” (New State for North Queensland Movement n.d.) Paraphrasing In the leaflet distributed by the New State for North Queensland Movement (n.d.) it is evident that… New State for North Queensland Movement n.d., A New state for North Queensland : why ? how ? when?, pamphlet, New State for North Queensland Movement, Townsville. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Maps Online In-Print Atlas (with editor) Atlas (without editor) Printed map (Google Earth, 2008) …..the position of the new city is to be north of Melbourne (ed. Eales 2003, Map 36). …the position of the new city is to be north of Melbourne (The Jacaranda Atlas 2003, Map 36). Motorways are indicated (Ordnance Survey, 2006)… Google Earth 6.0 2008, Hylands House and estates 51°42’39.17″N, 0°26’11.30″W, elevation 60M, 3D Buildings data layer, viewed 31 August 2011 Eales, S (ed.) 2003, The Jacaranda atlas, 3rd edn, John Wiley & Sons, Brisbane. The Jacaranda atlas 2003, 3rd edn, John Wiley & Sons, Brisbane. Ordnance Survey 2006, Chester and North Wales, Landranger series, Sheet 106, 1:50000, Ordnance Survey, Southampton. Media Release The description, ‘media release’, is inserted after the title of the media release. Direct quote In a statement released to the media, “Labor’s laws were driving small businesses to the wall,” Mr Baillieu said (2010). Paraphrasing Clearway changes were outlined in a release to the media (Baillieu, 2010). To reference an Online media release: Bailieu, T (Premier, Minister for the Arts) 2010, Coalition delivers for small business with clearways changes, media release, 9 December, Premier of Victoria, viewed 15 December 2010, . To reference a Paper media release: Watersmith, C. 2000, BHP enters new era, media release, 1 March, BHP limited, Melbourne. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Personal communication Personal communications includes letters, emails, interviews etc. Email addresses should never be cited without the permission of the owner of the address. Put all the details of the email letter etc. intext. This was confirmed by email (Brown 2012, pers. comm., 3 July). or Shickle S (2008 pers. comm., 8 July) verified that… Note: Personal communications can take a number of forms and are not normally available for consultation except under special circumstances. For this reason they are not usually included in the reference list. If a full citation is required, reference in the following way: Brown, A 2012, email, 3 July. Shickle, S 2008, email, 24 November. Plays and Poetry References to plays and poetry are often more precise if given in terms of acts, scenes, lines, verses, and so on. The following forms are recommended: William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, act 3, scene 2, line 74. or Judith Wright, Woman to child, verse 1, lines 3-5. Details of sources of this kind are not usually included in a reference list or bibliography. Statistics If using statistics from a database, the title of the database is in italics. (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009) For subsequent use, you can abbreviate (ABS 2009) Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009, Education and work, Australia, May 2009, cat. no. 6227.0, ABS, Canberra, viewed 24 November 2009, Format In-Text Reference Reference List Net sales in Australia for the year ending 2009 were $4,404,000.00 (Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd: Company Factfile 2010) . Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd: Company Factfile 2010, Euromonitor Global Market Information Database, viewed 20 March 2010, . Thesis Technically a thesis is not a published work, so the title is not placed in italics Under Award you might also put Masters thesis or Honours thesis Only put the location if it is not obvious from the name of the institution eg La Trobe University, Bundoora. University of Wollongong would be enough on its own Direct quote A model predictive control strategy was developed to optimise the selection of the optimal sequence of operating modes (Fiorentini 2016, p. 218) Paraphrasing Fiorentini (2016, p. 218) developed a model predictive control strategy… Fiorentini, M 2016, ‘Hybrid model predictive control of residential heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems with on-site energy generation and storage ‘, PhD thesis, University of Wollongong.

Case Clostridium defficile on an old man. Have to write assessment and care plan regarding theree different issues and activitie of living

Assessment 2 Assignment
Format Assignment
Due Date Thursday 26th October 2017 at 23:55
Weighting 60%
Pass mark Not applicable
Length 2500 words
 

Details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submission

Case study

You are the nurse looking after Mr James, an 82 year old male admitted to the Medical ward with Clostridium difficile (C-Diff). He currently has symptoms of watery diarrhoea, a temperature of 382 degrees Celsius abdominal pain, sudden weight loss and loss of appetite.  Mr James is also complaining of lethargy.

Instructions: Structure your assignment so that it meets the following requirements:

1. Introduction. (approx 250 words). Serves as a “map” of the essay, outlining to the reader the key points contained in the body of the work.

2. Discussion of Activities of Living (AoL’s) related to the Case Study – Maintaining a Safe Environment, Eating and Drinking, Personal Cleansing and Dressing and Elimination

Choose 3 of the four AoL’s and discuss how they have been altered for Mr James.  Your answer must include the following:

·         An overview of how the three AoL’s may be affected

·         How you would assess Mr James in relation to the three identified AoL’s. Include in your answer what care you would provide Mr James

3. Nursing Care Plan. Using the Nursing Care Plan provided identify one issue related to each AoL (3 issues in total) that has arisen from the case study. You are required to formulate a plan/goal for improving each issue, identify strategies for meeting each plan/goal and then discuss what evaluative measures will be taken to determine if each plan/ goal was met.

4. Conclusion (approx 250 words, start a new paragraph). Summarise the key points expressed in the body of the work, as well as the key learning from your research.

 

Refer to marking guide on the next page of this document

Please refer to detailed information on Submission of Assignments specific to your campus/education centre within your Subject Outline

No more than three (3) web based resources are to be used for this assessment

                                     

 

 

 

NMIH 107 Essentials of Care B

Assessment Task 2: Assignment Marking Guide

 

NAME: ………………………………………………………. STUDENT NO: …………………………….

 

 

 

 

 

Criteria

Absent  

Inadequate

 

 

Satisfactory

 

Good

 

Excellent

 

 

 

Marks

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study provide an overview of the three AoL’s and how they relate to the case study  

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-9

 

 

10-13

 

 

14-15

 

/15

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study discusses with relevant detail what assessments would be undertaken

 

 

 

0

 

 

1-7

 

 

8-13

 

 

13-17

 

 

18-20

 

/20

Discussion of AoL’s related to case study identifies and discusses relevant treatment of symptoms  

 

0

 

 

1-7

 

 

8-13

 

 

13-17

 

 

18-20

 

/20

Nursing Care Plan identifies three relevant issues (one for each AOL) and discusses a plan/goal, identifies relevant strategies for meeting the goal and discusses relevant evaluative strategies for each issue

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

1-4

 

 

 

5-9

 

 

 

10-13

 

 

 

14-15

 

 

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 Organisation.

Assignment logically developed. Evidence of introduction, body and conclusion. Evidence of linkage and integration of information. Prescribed format used. Adheres to the word limit.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

/10

Language & Style

Appropriate use of language. Technical terms explained where necessary. Range of vocabulary.

It catches the reader’s attention and promotes the           conveying of information. Objective and authentic writing  style.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

 

/10

Presentation.

Syntax, grammar, punctuation and spelling are correct. Legible presentation. Referencing as per Assessment Handbook.

 

 

0

 

 

1-4

 

 

5-6

 

 

7-8

 

 

9-10

 

/10

             
 
 

This assignment is worth 60% of the total assessment for this subject.

/ 100
  Late Penalty (if applicable):

 

 

 Marker:

UOW HARVARD REFERENCING STYLE Why Reference? Referencing is the process of linking what you read with what you write. It is important to reference all your sources: * To enable you or someone else to find the source of your information easily * To avoid plagiarism by acknowledging that you’ve used the ideas and work of others * To strengthen your arguments and add credibility by referring to expert ideas There are several styles of referencing. The Harvard format is utilised by many universities and schools. About the Harvard style of Referencing The Harvard referencing style is also known as the author date system because of the requirement to cite both the author and publication date within in your paper. The prominence of the author and date of publication in a reference list provides a clear indication of the credibility and currency of the resources used in your research. There is no definitive version of Harvard available. The UOW style of referencing is based on the AGPS Harvard version: Style manual for authors, editors and printers 2002, 6th edn, John Wiley, Milton, Qld. The UOW Harvard Referencing Style has two main components: In-text references/citations When you refer to another author’s work in your writing you must cite your source in the body of your paper by providing the last name(s) of the author(s), the year of publication and, where applicable, page number(s). The reference list A list at the end of your assignment which includes full details of each source you have cited in your writing. Sources are listed in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. In-text Referencing There are two main ways to present in-text references, or citations: 1. Information prominent Where the focus is on the information from your source. You give prominence to the information by placing the reference at the end of your sentence in brackets. For example, “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any…” (Metcalf 2005, p. 184) “The experience of …” (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 28) 2. Author prominent Where the focus is on the author(s) of your source. You give prominence to the author by placing the reference in the body of your sentence, with the author’s name incorporated into the sentence structure and the date in brackets For example, Metcalf (2005, p. 184) claims that “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or councils of elders, no armies or law enforcement” Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 28) argue that “…” NOTES * Page Numbers Always include page numbers when you: * Quote word for word * Summarise or paraphrase an idea from a specific page or pages * Refer to tables, figures, images or present specific information like dates/statistics. * Quotation Marks The Harvard (AGPS) and Footnoting (Oxford) manual recommends using SINGLE quotation marks around any direct quote. If you use Turnitin, be sure to enclose all direct quotes in DOUBLE quotation marks because Turnitin recognises only the text enclosed in double quotation marks as a direct quote. In this Referencing and Citing Guide, all Author-Date/Harvard and Footnoting direct quote examples are presented within double quotation marks. Reference List A reference list appears in alphabetical order at the end of your work. Many people confuse the terms ‘reference list’ and ‘bibliography’. A reference list includes ONLY the sources that you have CITED/REFERENCED in the body of your work. A bibliography includes the sources you cited plus any additional resources you may have consulted in your research. This is an example of a reference list: Blair, DJ 1996, ‘Beyond the metaphor: football and war, 1914-1918’, Journal of the Australian War Memorial, no.28, viewed 15/5/2007, http://www.awm.gov.au/journal/j28/j28- blai.htm Department of Veterans’ Affairs 2006, Helpful Links to Veteran Related Sites, viewed 10/8/2006, http://www.dva.gov.au/contacts/site.htm Dolnicar, S, Crouch, GI & Long, P 2008, ‘Environment-friendly tourists: what do we really know about them?’, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, vol.16, no.2, pp. 197-210. Dolnicar, S & Hurliman, A 2010, ‘Australians’ water conservation behaviours and attitudes’, Australian Journal of Water Resources, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 43-53. A History of Reclamation in the West 2000, History Program, Bureau of Reclamation, Salt Lake City, Utah. Malinowski, W, Larsen, AA, Ngu, B & Fairweather, S 1999, Human Geography, Routledge, New York. Preston, AC 1990a, Multivariate Analysis of Nurses’ Absence Behaviour, Business Research and Development Fund of the Confederation of Western Australian Industry, East Perth, WA. Preston, AC 1990b, Theories and Causes of Labour Absence: Reconciling the Economic and Psychology Approaches, Business Research and Development Fund of the Confederation of Western Australian Industry, East Perth, WA. Rose, DB 2002, ‘Good hunters’, in Country of the Heart: An Indigenous Australian Homeland, Aboriginal Studies Press for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, pp. 77- 113. NOTES 1. Always check with your academic to determine what is required for your particular assignment. 2. If there are multiple works by the same author in your reference list, put the earliest date first. 3. Make sure the author details and year in the in-text citation exactly match the entry in the reference list. Format In -Text Reference Reference List BOOKS Format In-Text Reference Reference List Book review Direct quote Nadel points to Stoppard’s constant scepticism about autobiography and biography (Carroll 2002, p. 8). Paraphrasing Carroll (2002, p. 8) shows that… Carroll, S 2002, ‘The stuff of theatre’, review of Double act: a life of Tom Stoppard by Ira Nadel, Age, 28 September, Saturday Extra, p. 8. Chapter in an edited book Refer to the author of the chapter in-text. In the Reference List set out the editor’s name with initials first then family name. Put the title of the chapter in ‘single quotes’. Do not italicise. Put (ed.), for a single editor or (eds), for multiple editors followed by a comma. The pages of the chapter are added after the publication details. Direct quote Gray (2009, p. 75) concludes the following “…” Paraphrasing Another demonstration of this is… (Gray 2009, p. 75) Gray, E 2009, ‘The hair of Milton: historicism and literary history’, in DW Davies (ed.), Romanticism, history, historicism: essays on an orthodoxy, Routledge, New York, pp. 32-42. Corporate author – when the author is also the publisher …a better world (Deni Green Consulting Services 2008, p. 5). Deni Green Consulting Services 2008, Capital idea: realising value from environmental and social performance, Deni Green Consulting Services, North Carlton, Victoria. Format In-Text Reference Reference List e-Book In-text referencing and reference list entry is the same for eBooks as print. Direct quote “students taught by teachers with greater verbal ability learn more than those taught by teachers with lower verbal ability” (Stronge 2007, p. 4) Paraphrasing Stronge (2007, p. 4) notes the correlation between… Stronge, JH 2007, Qualities of effective teachers, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA. Edited Book Use the abbreviation ed. for a single editor and eds (no full stop) for more than one editor. Use the abbreviation edn (no full stop) for edition. Write ed., eds and edn in lower case not capitals. Direct quote “Human security…” (eds McGrew & Poku 2007, p. 8). “Hinduism is not defined…” (ed. Flood 2003, p. 5) Paraphrasing According to McGrew and Poku (eds 2007, p. 8)… Flood (ed. 2003, p. 5) comments that Hinduism is… McGrew, A & Poku, NK (eds) 2007, Globalization, development and human security, Polity, Cambridge, UK. Flood, G (ed.) 2003, The Blackwell companion to Hinduism, Blackwell, Oxford. Encyclopedia or dictionary (print) Use the word ‘in’ before the title of the publication. Encyclopedia entry with author Direct quote Smith, MJ 1993, ‘Anarchy’, in The Oxford Companion to the Format In-Text Reference Reference List Encyclopedia entry with no author If no author is evident and a well known source is being cited you can put all the necessary information in-text. You do not need to put this reference in the reference list. Use italics when including the title of the dictionary/encyclopedia in-text. “Anarchy refers to the absence of authoritative institutions or norms above independent sovereign states.” (Smith 1993) Paraphrasing Smith (1993) observes that anarchy places states in a permanent position of rivalry with each other. The Macquarie dictionary (2005) defines a larrikin as… or …(The New Encyclopedia Britannica 1997) Politics of the World, J Krieger (ed.), Oxford University Press, New York. Encyclopedia or dictionary (website) If you have used a dictionary or encyclopedia from a website include the viewed date and URL Direct quote The heel of Achilles is “[t]he vulnerable or weak point in a man’s character or of a nation.” (Dictionary of phrase and fable 2000) Paraphrasing The Dictionary of phrase and fable (2000) defines Achilles’ heel as… ‘Achilles tendon’ 2000, in Dictionary of phrase and fable, EC Brewer (ed.), Bartelby.com, viewed 30 November 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Encyclopedia or dictionary (online database) If the online encyclopedia is from a library reference database e.g. Gale Virtual Reference or Oxford Reference Online, cite it the same as the print. Do not include the date viewed, the database name or the URL. Direct quote “Descent systems determine…” (Velioti-Georgopoulos 2006). Paraphrasing Velioti-Georgopoulos (2006) emphasises that kinship and descent should be treated as different concepts. Velioti-Georgopoulos, M 2006 ‘Kinship and Descent’, in Encyclopedia of Anthropology, HJ Birx (ed.), vol. 3, Sage Reference, Thousand Oaks, CA. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Multiple authors – Two or three Cite the names of the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the book. Unlike the reference list which requires author/s initials, in-text references use author/s surnames only and do not include initials. When referring to multiple authors in a sentence use ‘and’ instead of ‘&’. When citing the names of multiple authors in brackets use ‘&’ before the last author. Direct quote “The experience of …” (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p. 28) or Savage, Bagnall and Longhurst (2005, p. 28) argue that “…” Paraphrasing The migrant experience is one that… (Savage, Bagnall & Longhurst 2005, p.28) Savage, M, Bagnall, G & Longhurst, B 2005, Globalization and belonging, SAGE, London. Multiple authors – More than three authors For in-text citations, list the name of the first author followed by et al. (meaning ‘and others’). Do not use et al. in the reference list. List all the authors. Direct quote Kring et al. (2010, p. 72) outline the theory as “…” or “The theory…” (Kring et al. 2010, p. 72) Paraphrasing Abnormal is not always…(Kring et al. 2010, pp. 47-48) Kring, A, Davison, GC, Neale, JM & Johnson, S 2010, Abnormal psychology, 11th edn, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ. Multiple works by same author Format In-Text Reference Reference List Same author different years Arrange the in-text citation in chronological order starting with the earliest date first. Use a semicolon to separate the page reference from the date following it. In the reference list begin with the earliest date first. The name of the author can be repeated but it is preferable to use the em dash — with no space before the date. Same author same year Distinguish between the titles in-text by adding a lower case letter of the alphabet starting with ‘a’. In the reference list place the lower case letter after the date with no space. Dyer (2009; 2013) reported that leadership and communication… or Leadership and communication are…. (Dyer 2009, p. 223; 2013, p. 149) “In the last 10 years Australia has experienced…” (Manne 2005a, p. 1) Manne (2005b, p. 14) argued that the corporate media power… Dyer, J 2009, The business communication handbook, 8th edn, Pearson, Frenchs Forest, NSW. —2013, Communication for business and the professions: strategies and skills, 5th edn, Pearson, Frenchs Forest, NSW. Manne, R (ed.) 2005a, Do not disturb: is the media failing Australia?, Black Inc., Melbourne. — 2005b, Left right left: political essays 1977-2005, Black Inc., Melbourne. No author or editor List the item alphabetically in the reference list by the title then date. Do not use Anon or Anonymous. Italicise the title in the In-text citation as well as in the Reference List Cite the work by its title and date. Direct quote “Ant behaviour patterns …” (The life of insects 1979, p. 23) Paraphrasing The life of insects 1979, Silver Burdett Co., Morristown, NJ. Format In-Text Reference Reference List In The life of insects (1979, p. 23) it is claimed that… Format In-Text Reference Reference List No date of publication If there is no date use n.d. If there is an approximate date use c. (this means ‘circa’ – Latin for ‘around/about’). This is emphasised by Seah (n.d.) when… This is emphasised by Seah (c. 2005) when… Seah, R n.d., Micro-computer applications, Microsoft Press, Redmond, Washington. Seah, R c.2005, Micro-computer applications, Microsoft Press, Redmond, Washington. Second or later edition Any edition other than the first edition must be included in the reference list citation. The edition statement is added after the title, followed by a comma. A reprint is not a new edition. It does not need a specific mention. Use the abbreviation edn (no full stop) for edition. Direct quote “Student centred learning…” (Killen 2009, p. 10) Paraphrasing Effective teaching is based on several… (Killen 2009, p. 10) Killen, R 2009, Effective teaching strategies: lessons from research and practice, 5th edn, Cengage Learning, South Melbourne. Secondary sources This is where the work of one author is cited in another author’s work For the in-text citation you might write: As the cultural critic Norman Klein stated in 1997, “the Romantics gloried in the ruins of memory” (cited in Cameron 2008, p. 5) In the Reference List you only need to record the book that you actually sourced: Cameron, A 2008, Modular Narratives in Contemporary Cinema, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, New York. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Single author – Paraphrasing Metcalf (2005, p. 184) propounded the idea that… Metcalf, P 2005, Anthropology: the basics, Routledge, Abingdon. Single author – when fewer than 30 words are quoted Include the quote within the paragraph and include specific page number/s. Use quotation marks to show the exact words. Metcalf (2005, p. 184) argues that “the Nuer of southern Sudan lacked any institutions of governance; no chiefs or councils of elders, no armies or law enforcement” Metcalf, P 2005, Anthropology: the basics, Routledge, Abingdon. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Single author – when 30 or more words are quoted Begin quoting the material on a new line. Indent it 5 spaces (use the Indent tool to keep all lines of the quote evenly indented). Include specific page number/s. Also, always include the page number(s) when drawing primarily on a particular page or section rather than referring to the source as a whole. In-text use p. for a single page (Metcalf 2005, p. 45) and pp. for a page range e.g. (Metcalf 2005, pp. 34-36). Omit quotation marks. Use double spacing for your text and single spacing for the intended quote. Make sure the quote is exactly as it was published. Much has been written about acute care. Finkelman (2006, p. 184), for example, points out that: There are many changes in acute care services occurring almost daily, and due to the increasing use of outpatient surgery, surgical services have experienced major changes. Hospitals are increasing the size of their outpatient or ambulatory surgery departments and adjusting to the need of moving patients into and out of the surgical service in 1 day or even a few hours. Recently, this trend has been seen in some Australian hospitals and research here… Finkelman, AW 2006, Leadership and management in nursing, Pearson Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Translated work Format In-Text Reference Reference List When the role of a translator, compiler, or reviser, is acknowledged, the initials precede the surname. This format also applies to compilers, editors and revisers. Use the abbreviations rev., trans., ed./eds or comp./comps appropriate. Direct quote Cite the author, not the translator of the book in the in-text citation “Morality…” (Nietzsche 1956, p. 27) Paraphrasing Nietzsche (1956, p. 27) argues that… Give acknowledgement to the translator after the title: Nietzsche, FW 1956, The birth of tragedy: and, The genealogy of morals, trans. F Golffing, Doubleday, Garden City, New York. Format In-Text Reference Reference List JOURNAL, NEWSPAPER & NEWSLETTER ARTICLES Journal articles Capitalise all main words in the Journal Title (not ‘and’ ‘of’ ‘in’ etc.). The title of the article is in quotes. The title of the journal is in italics. Author, initial(s) Year of publication, ‘Article title’, Journal Title, vol. (volume number), no. (issue number if any), p./pp. (page number/range). Journal article with one author Direct quote Lee (2007, p. 157) draws on data collected from “…” Paraphrasing The ongoing need for remittances…(Lee 2007, p. 160) Lee, H 2007, ‘Transforming transnationalism: second generation Tongans overseas’, Asian and Pacific Migration Journal, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 157-178. Journal article with two or three authors Format In-Text Reference Reference List Cite the names of the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the article. When the authors names are incorporated into your text, use ‘and’ instead of ‘&’. If the names of the authors are in brackets use ‘&’ before the last author. Direct quote Carlin and Ford (2006, p. 79) claim that, “paying executives in the form of options…”. or “A further noteworthy influence…” (Carlin & Ford 2006, p. 79). Paraphrasing The group of 100 joined the ASX and other associations… (Carlin & Ford 2006, p. 79). Carlin, TY & Ford, G 2006, ‘A governance perspective on executive options plans – some Australian empirical evidence’, Australian Accounting Review, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 75-84. Journal article with more than three authors In-Text List the name of the first author followed by et al. (meaning ‘and others’) Reference list List all authors. Do not use ‘et al.’ Enter the authors in the order they appear on the title page of the article. Direct quote Wattal et al. conclude that, “[p]olitics in the United States has come a long way…” (2010, p. 670). or “We believe information systems can provide insight into…” (Wattal et al. 2010, p. 670). Paraphrasing The candidates site “stickiness” is not determined by popularity (Wattal et al. 2010, p. 670). Wattal, S, Schuff, D, Mandviwalla, M & Williams, CB 2010, ‘Web 2.0 and politics: the 2008 U.S. presidential election and an epolitics research agenda’, MIS Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 669- 688. Journal article with no volume or issue number Format In-Text Reference Reference List An interesting approach to scam (Wychick & Thompson 2005) suggests that… Wychick, J & Thompson, L 2005, ‘Fallen for a scam lately?’ Australia Today, 24 November, pp54-60. Journal article with no author Use the ‘title of the article’ in place of the author in-text Put the ‘title of the article’ in single quotes List the article alphabetically by its title in the reference list. Direct quote “During his campaign Obama…”(‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ 2010, p. 45) Paraphrasing In the article ‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ (2010, p. 45) the author laments… ‘Restructuring USAID: time to match rhetoric with deeds’ 2010, The Lancet, vol. 376, Iss. 9747, p. 1118. Journal article retrieved from the Internet Follow this example if the journal article is only available via the internet. Enclose the URL in the ‘greater than’ ‘less than’ symbols < >. Put what journal details are available after the title. Volume and issue nos. may not always available. If there is no author use the ‘title of the article’ in place of the author in-text. Direct quote Findings suggest that “[i]ntercultural communication skills… in ELT” (Xiao & Petraki 2007) Paraphrasing Xiao and Petraki (2007) establish in their study that… Xiao, H & Petraki E 2007, ‘An Investigation of Chinese students’ difficulties in intercultural communication and its role in ELT’, Journal of Intercultural Communication, no. 13, viewed 27 November 2010, Secondary sources Format In-Text Reference Reference List Where the work of one author is cited in another author’s work For in-text citations: Fong’s 1987 study (cited in Betram 1996, p. 9) found that memory … In the Reference List record only the journal you actually sourced i.e. Bertram reference. Journal articles retrieved from a database If an article is accessed using a library database e.g. Proquest or Expanded Academic, cite it the same as the print article. Do not include the date viewed, database name or URL. Direct quote Carlin and Ford (2006, p. 79) observe that, “paying executives in the form of options…”. Or “A further noteworthy influence…” (Carlin & Ford, 2006, p. 79). Paraphrasing The group of 100 joined the ASX and other associations… (Carlin & Ford, 2006, p. 79). Carlin, TY & Ford, G 2006, ‘A governance perspective on executive options plans – some Australian empirical evidence’, Australian Accounting Review, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 75-84. Journal articles retrieved from a database (no author) See entry for Journal article with no author In-text Referencing Newspaper articles Format In-Text Reference Reference List Newspaper title is in italics. Leave out ‘The’ in the title. Use Australian or Sydney Morning Herald. Newspaper article – with author/s Newspaper headline is the article title in single quotes. Include the date of issue (day month) of the newspaper after the title. Include the page number of the article in the Reference list. Do not include page numbers in the in-text reference. Direct quote “In a break with tradition, the Prime Minister’s office supplied video footage of the visit taken…” (Crowe 2015). Paraphrasing Crowe (2015) compares inclusion of media teams to Tony Abbott’s visit to Baghdad with previous prime ministerial visits to Iraq and Afghanistan. Crowe, D 2015, ‘ Anger as media left grounded’, Australian, 06 January, p. 4. Newspaper article – with no author If the author is not evident provide all the details in the in-text citation including the page nos. Direct quote “A British Ministry of Defence spokesman confirmed…” (Australian 12 November 2010, p. 14). Paraphrasing The report in the Australian (12 November 2010, p. 14) remarked that Breaker Morant… Not required as all details are provided in-text Format In-Text Reference Reference List Newspaper article retrieved from a database Reference a newspaper article from a database e.g. Factiva or ProQuest in exactly the same way as you would a newspaper article in print. There is no need to acknowledge which database the article came from. See either the examples for Newspaper article with author or without author. Online newspaper or newsletter article Add the URL and date viewed for articles found on a Newspaper webpage. Direct quote “China, for instance, is targeting…over 15 years” (Gittens 2010). Paraphrasing Gittens (2010) accuses Australia of being behind other countries efforts to reduce carbon. Gittins, R 2010, ‘Suits us to be deluded on climate,’ The Age, 17 November, viewed 6 December, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS ABS Statistics Abbreviate publisher to ABS. Author will always be Australian Bureau of Statistics. Place of publication for printed statistics is always Canberra. Year of publication is the year it is released not the date in the title. Include the Catalogue number preceded by cat. no. (the number is part of the title on ABS publications). Direct quote “The number of divorces has been decreasing each year after reaching a peak in 2001” (ABS 2008). Paraphrasing According the Australian Bureau of Statistics (2008) the median length of a marriage to separation is approximately 9 years. Print Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, ABS, Canberra. Online Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, viewed 17 January 2011, . Government Department as Author/s Format In-Text Reference Reference List It is common when referencing government publications to have the same group author and publisher. In the reference list put in entries for both the full group author name and the abbreviated name. If a committee has prepared the report for a government department or agency use the committee name as the author, and the government department as the publisher. “According to the International Atomic Energy Agency… unauthorised movements of nuclear material” (Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 2005, p. 12). Long group author names If the group author name is long and cited frequently abbreviate the name in the in-text citation e.g. “International community has had success….renounce nuclear weapons” (DFAT 2010, p. 14). Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 2005, Weapons of mass destruction Australia’s role in fighting proliferation : practical responses to new challenges, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Canberra. DFAT – see Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Government Report (print or online) Often the author and the publisher are the same in Government publications. Abbreviate long group names if being referred to often. Put both the abbreviated and full form of the group author in the reference list. PDF documents look like the printed document and should contain all the publication details. Often online reports are the same as print, just add the date accessed and the URL after the publication details. Direct quote “Between 1887 and 1954 private welfare agencies and individuals were authorised to apprehend children” (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 1997, p. 55). “Eight events remain significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a mother experiencing high distress they are…” (Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009, p. 36). Paraphrasing In the Bringing them home report it highlights the strategy of permanently retaining children who were placed temporarily in respite accommodation (Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, 1997, p. 55). Print Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 1997, Bringing them home: report of the national inquiry into the separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families, Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission, Sydney. Online Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009, Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: 2008–09 Annual Report, FaHCSIA, Canberra, viewed 12 December 2010, . FaHCSIA see Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Stress is a key factor contributing to poorer outcomes for mother and infant (FaHCSIA 2009, p. 36) Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) print or online Parliamentary debates are referenced using the Jurisdiction (eg. Australia or New South Wales) followed by the Chamber (eg. House of Representatives or Senate for Commonwealth, and Legislative Assembly or Legislative Council for NSW) The title Debates is always in italics. The volume number may not be available in the online versions. Direct quote The then Minister for Health, John Thwaites (Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000, p. 2145) reveals that “The National and Victorian Drug Household Survey indicate…” The Prime Minister, Mr Howard predicted that “in the foreseeable future nuclear power…fossil fuel” (Australia, House of Representatives 2006, p. 41). Paraphrasing Thwaites outlined the Government’s plan for safe injecting facilities in the Second Reading Speech… (Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000 pp. 2144-2149). The Prime Minister Mr Howard (Australia, House of Representatives 2006, p.40) outlined his defence for the government’s failure to sign… Print Victoria, Legislative Assembly 2000, Debates, vol. 447, pp. 2144- 2149. Online Australia, House of Representatives 2006, Debates, viewed 12 December 2010, . Parliamentary Paper A reference to a Commonwealth Parliamentary paper would begin Australia, Parliament… If a Commissioner or Chairperson is mentioned their name goes after the title Direct quote In the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission it was acknowledged that “underground cable essentially eliminates bushfire risk associated with the provision of electricity” (Victoria, Parliament 2010, p.154). Victoria, Parliament 2010, 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission, (B. Teague, Chairperson) Parl. Paper 332, vol. 2, The Commission, Melbourne. Format In -Text Reference Reference List in round brackets. Format In-Text Reference Reference List LEGAL PUBLICATIONS Legal Cases The following details are required for intext and reference citations: * the name of the case * the year or volume number, or both * the page on which the report of the case begins The name of the case is italicised. The year is enclosed in parentheses. Square brackets are used when there is no volume number and the year is an integral part of the title, i.e. square brackets indicate that the year of publication is the volume number. If you are referring to a particular page of the judgment, include a ‘pinpoint reference’ to the actual page in the in-text citation. Use the word ‘at’ instead of p. Do not include URLs for cases found online. Direct quote The judge in R v Ramage (2004) VSC 508 stated the “The Court cannot allow…” Paraphrasing In the case of Mabo v. Queensland (no. 2) (1992) 175 CLR1, it was… The case, Jones v. Sherlock (2009) NSWSC 246 showed that… In Northern Sandblasting Pty Ltd v. Harris (1997) 188 CLR 313 at 334 the High Court held that the landlord was in breach of a contractual duty of care owed to the tenants and to their family. R v. Ramage (2004) VSC 508 Chappel v Hart [1998] HCA 55 Mabo v. Queensland (no. 2) (1992) 175 CLR1. Jones v. Sherlock (2009) NSWSC 246. Northern Sandblasting Pty Ltd v. Harris (1997) 188 CLR 313. Legislation Format In-Text Reference Reference List Legislation should be referenced as if in print even if viewed electronically Acts Most legislation has a short formal title that can be used for citation purposes. The first in-text reference to an Act or Ordinance should cite the short formal title, in italics, exactly and in full. In subsequent references the title can be shown in roman type without the date. Do not place a comma between the title and the year. If the name of the legislation begins with an article (eg. a, an, the) do not omit the article in the citation. Bills Bills before parliament are ‘unpublished’ and should be cited in roman type not italics. First in-text reference: In relation to action regarding unsuitable goods, s. 74B of the Trade Practices Act 1974 states… Subsequent in-text reference/s: According to the Trade Practices Act… Example of an act beginning with an article: The Commonwealth’s A New Tax System (Wine Equalisation Tax) Act 1999 makes provision for… In the Companion Animals Amendment Bill 2006 (NSW) there is provision for…. Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cwlth). Companion Animals Amendment Bill 2006 (NSW). Patents & Standards Format In-Text Reference Reference List Patents For patents the title may be more of a descriptive title rather than a formal title Identifying elements such as patent numbers should be included If no individual author is available, a corporate author can be used in the in-text reference. Standards For standards not retrieved from an electronic database, replace online database information with publisher information. Paraphrase The particle trap design is… (Cookson 1985) Direct quote The rule from Standards Australia (2009, p. 23) is: “[a]n adhesive label…” Paraphrase …stated that glass in buildings must be… (Standards Australia Online 2006) Cookson, AH 1985, Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems, US Patent 4554399. Mccallum, JM 2008, Method for and composition of excipient suitable for use in herbal formulations and formulations derived therefrom, Australian Patent AU 2008100919, viewed 8 December 2008, SciFinder Scholar. Standards Australia 2009, LP Gas fuel vessels for automotive use, AS/NZS 3509:2009, Standards Australia, Sydney. Standards Australia Online 2006, Glass in buildings: selection and installations, AS 1288-2006, amended 31 January 2008, viewed 19 May 2009, SAI Global Database Format In-Text Reference Reference List WEB RESOURCES Blogs If no proper name is given, the author’s username may be used instead. If the author puts multiple posts up on the same day, include the time the entry was posted.- e.g. 12 November 13:53. If you are referencing a comment from a weblog, use the name of the commenter instead of the author of the weblog post and use ‘weblog comment’ instead of ‘web log post’ for format. Include the exact title (Including ‘Re:’ if used). If you are using the whole blog and not an individual post, do not include the Blog Post Title and change the format to weblog. Direct quote “The whole idea of a conspiracy is that it takes two or more people conspiring” (Henderson 2010). …as Henderson questions, “[t]he whole idea of a conspiracy…” (2010). Paraphrasing Henderson’s weblog post (2010) covers how the meaning of the word conspiracy has changed to mean self-dealing. Henderson, D 2010, Has the word ‘conspiracy’ lost its meaning?, Library of Economics and Liberty, weblog post, 13 December, viewed 21 December 2010, Document from a Website If there is no author begin the reference with the title of the document. Include page numbers in-text if it is a long document. Use n.d. if there is no date. Direct quote “Following the intensification of the GFC…weaken markedly” (Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry 2010, p. 5). Paraphrasing Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry 2010, Issues Paper Youth Employment, Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, viewed 15 December 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2010) found that more Australian youth are unable to find work in 2010 than in 2008. Podcast / Vodcast If the podcast has no recognisable author, start with the title and put the year after the title. Use the title in the in-text referencing. Direct quote ….”while the octopus was carrying the coconut, it was actually of no benefit to it”, Julian Finn explains on the La Trobe University Podcast (2010). Paraphrasing This podcast show is about who owns the fish and the ocean (The War on Fish 2010). Finn, J & Norman, M 2010, Have coconut, will travel, vodcast, 23 April, La Trobe University, viewed 10 January 2011, . The war on fish 2010, podcast, 9 July, La Trobe University, viewed 10 January 2011, . Social Media (Twitter, Facebook etc.) Before using a reference from Twitter or Facebook make sure it is appropriate for academic work. If no proper name is given, use the username. As tweets and status updates do not have Direct quote The BP Parody account created on Twitter, notes “[c]atastrophe is a strong word, let’s all agree to call it a whoopsie daisy”. (BP Public Relations 2010). Paraphrasing BP Public Relations 2010, ‘Catastrophe is a strong…’, BPGlobalPR, Twitter, 24 May, viewed 10 January 2011, . Office of the Prime Minister 2011, ‘Prime Minister Gillard today announced…’, Julia Gillard, Facebook, 13 January, viewed 20 January 2011, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List titles, use the first few words of the message as a title. The Office of The Prime Minister (2010), updated their Julia Gillard Facebook page on 13 Jan, with… Webpage If there is no author or organisation name begin the reference with the title of the webpage. Direct quote “The risk threshold for entry to the Gateway Review Process is high risk” (Department of Finance and Deregulation 2010). Paraphrasing According to the Department of Finance and Deregulation, the Gateway process… (2010). The Gateway Review Process 2010, Department of Finance and Deregulation, viewed 10 December 2010, . Online video Direct quote “Googling is great and everybody does it but not for university assignments” (LTULibrary 2010). Paraphrasing This video shows why you shouldn’t just use Google when researching for university assignments (LTULibrary 2010). The CSIRO YouTube video (2009) reveals … LTULibrary 2010, Why can’t I just google?, online video, 9 February, La Trobe University, viewed 20 January 2011, . CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) 2009, Making a difference, online video, 25 May, CSIRO, Viewed December 9, 2010, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Format In-Text Reference Reference List OTHER SOURCES Conference Papers Published If the conference paper is available online add the viewed date and URL after the place of publication. The title of the conference is put in italics. Unpublished If the paper is not published the title of the conference is not in Italics. Use the phrase paper presented at after the title of the paper and before the title of the conference. Put the dates of the conference (range of days and month) after the place. Direct quote ‘To engage productively with assessment tasks…’ (Kift & Moody 2009). Paraphrasing Kift and Moody (2009) observe that first year students require an induction to academic conventions to engage with assessment. Direct quote “Students are more likely to persist and graduate in settings that hold…” (Tinto 2009). Paraphrasing Tinto (2009) identifies his four main conditions for student retention as… Kift, S M, & Moody, KE 2009, ‘Harnessing assessment and feedback in the first year to support learning success, engagement and retention’, in ATN Assessment Conference 2009 Proceedings, RMIT University, Melbourne, 19 – 20 November, viewed 8 November 2010, . Tinto, V 2009, ‘Taking the student retention seriously: rethinking the first year at university’, paper presented at the FYE Curriculum Design Symposium, Queensland University of Technology, 5-6 February, viewed 12 December 2010, Course Material Format In-Text Reference Reference List State the type of course material after the title of the lecture. You can use the subject code or the subject name. Course material is unpublished so the title is enclosed in single quotes not italics. Direct quote “Socialisation into roles is a major impetus behind inequality” (Wallace 2010). Paraphrasing It was pointed out in the week 2 lecture that kinship… (Lee 2010) Wallace, P 2010, ‘Gender & sexuality’ PowerPoint slides, SOC1SAC, La Trobe University, viewed 19 January 2011. Lee, H 2010, ‘Charting Kinship’, lecture, ANT2KAM, La Trobe University, delivered 5 August. Figure / Graph / Table Any reproduced table, figure or graph must reference the original author and copyright holder. In the reference list, reference the source where the graph or table is located. The graph Divorces granted: Australia 1988 – 2007 (ABS 2008) illustrates… Australian Bureau of Statistics 2008, Divorces Australia 2007, cat. no. 3307.0.55.001, ABS, Canberra. Film, Video & Television Format In-Text Reference Reference List Film & Video The in-text references to films DVDs, videos, television, and radio programs should contain the title (in italics) and date of production. The key elements of a film or audiovisual reference are: * Title (in italics) * Year of publication or release * Format (use motion picture for films; use video recording, CD-ROM, DVD, audio cassette, slide, or microform etc. for other audiovisual material) * Distributor (for films) or publisher * Place of recording or publication (for audiovisual material) Although you are likely to view most feature films (i.e. movies) as DVDs, you should still reference feature films with the format ‘motion picture’ rather than ‘DVD’. Any special credits and other information that may be useful can be noted after the citation e.g. Revolutionary road 2009, DVD, Paramount Home Entertainment Australia, Abbotsford Vic., starring Leonardo Di Caprio and Kate Winslet. Television Place the Title in italics, and date of …….as portrayed in About Jenny Holzer (2011) The scene, towards the end of the film, depicts… (Alien Underworld 2002) Woody Allen in Annie Hall (1977) demonstrates the art of… A recent Four Corners episode highlighted the difficulties of About Jenny Holzer 2011, DVD, Microcinema International, San Francisco, California. Alien Underworld 2002, video recording, Tattooed Media and the Australian Film Finance Corporation, Australia, written & directed by Sonya Pemberton. Annie Hall 1977, motion picture, MGM Home Entertainment, Santa Monica CA, directed by Woody Allen. Breaking Point, Four Corners 2010, television program, Australian Format In-Text Reference Reference List recording in the in-text citation. If the program is part of a series put the episode title first followed by the series title both in italics. Add the broadcast date after the publication details. caring for disabled family members (Breaking Point 2010). When interviewed on 7.30 Report (2015) the Treasurer said … It could be argued that the financial situation at the time necessitated…. (What are we going to do with the money? 1997) Broadcasting Corporation, Australia, February 15. 7.30 Report 2015, television program, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Australia, 18 November. What are we going to do with the money? 1997, television program, Special Broadcasting Service, Australia, 8 August Images & Artwork Online When reproducing/including an image in your work, place the in-text reference immediately under the image. For the format description: use ‘Image’ for photographs or graphics. Where the image is a photograph of an artwork, and the photographer has been specifically credited, note this after the title In the image above (Jorgensen 2010) you can see… Kamuro (2008) illustrates … (Sculpture by the sea – Elephant 2009) (Van Gogh 1890) Jorgensen, L 2010, Lighthouse Freezes, image, ABC News, viewed 17 December 2010, . Kamuro (2008) Calmness, image, Flickr viewed 30 June 2010, . Sculpture by the sea – Elephant 2009, image, photographed by A. Wain, Flickr, viewed 4 February 2014, . Format In-Text Reference Reference List Where the photographer or artist is not known, start your reference with the Title of Image. Where none of the usual details are known, i.e. artist/photographer, date, title of image, start with [Subject of the image]. In-Print If you are citing an image from a printed source, reference the printed source as normal and use a page number in your intext citation to indicate which page the image comes from. (Gaunt 1970, p. 17) Van Gogh, V. 1890, Undergrowth with two figures, Google Cultural Institute, viewed 4 March 2014, . Gaunt, W. 1970, The impressionists, Thames & Hudson, London. Leaflet / Pamphlet Use the authorising body/publisher as the author OR use the title of the pamphlet/leaflet if there is no author. Use the title of the pamphlet in-text if there is no author. Use n.d. for no date. Use c. if you can approximately date the document e.g. c. 1985. Use the word “pamphlet” after the title. Direct quote “…” (New State for North Queensland Movement n.d.) Paraphrasing In the leaflet distributed by the New State for North Queensland Movement (n.d.) it is evident that… New State for North Queensland Movement n.d., A New state for North Queensland : why ? how ? when?, pamphlet, New State for North Queensland Movement, Townsville. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Maps Online In-Print Atlas (with editor) Atlas (without editor) Printed map (Google Earth, 2008) …..the position of the new city is to be north of Melbourne (ed. Eales 2003, Map 36). …the position of the new city is to be north of Melbourne (The Jacaranda Atlas 2003, Map 36). Motorways are indicated (Ordnance Survey, 2006)… Google Earth 6.0 2008, Hylands House and estates 51°42’39.17″N, 0°26’11.30″W, elevation 60M, 3D Buildings data layer, viewed 31 August 2011 Eales, S (ed.) 2003, The Jacaranda atlas, 3rd edn, John Wiley & Sons, Brisbane. The Jacaranda atlas 2003, 3rd edn, John Wiley & Sons, Brisbane. Ordnance Survey 2006, Chester and North Wales, Landranger series, Sheet 106, 1:50000, Ordnance Survey, Southampton. Media Release The description, ‘media release’, is inserted after the title of the media release. Direct quote In a statement released to the media, “Labor’s laws were driving small businesses to the wall,” Mr Baillieu said (2010). Paraphrasing Clearway changes were outlined in a release to the media (Baillieu, 2010). To reference an Online media release: Bailieu, T (Premier, Minister for the Arts) 2010, Coalition delivers for small business with clearways changes, media release, 9 December, Premier of Victoria, viewed 15 December 2010, . To reference a Paper media release: Watersmith, C. 2000, BHP enters new era, media release, 1 March, BHP limited, Melbourne. Format In-Text Reference Reference List Personal communication Personal communications includes letters, emails, interviews etc. Email addresses should never be cited without the permission of the owner of the address. Put all the details of the email letter etc. intext. This was confirmed by email (Brown 2012, pers. comm., 3 July). or Shickle S (2008 pers. comm., 8 July) verified that… Note: Personal communications can take a number of forms and are not normally available for consultation except under special circumstances. For this reason they are not usually included in the reference list. If a full citation is required, reference in the following way: Brown, A 2012, email, 3 July. Shickle, S 2008, email, 24 November. Plays and Poetry References to plays and poetry are often more precise if given in terms of acts, scenes, lines, verses, and so on. The following forms are recommended: William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, act 3, scene 2, line 74. or Judith Wright, Woman to child, verse 1, lines 3-5. Details of sources of this kind are not usually included in a reference list or bibliography. Statistics If using statistics from a database, the title of the database is in italics. (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009) For subsequent use, you can abbreviate (ABS 2009) Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009, Education and work, Australia, May 2009, cat. no. 6227.0, ABS, Canberra, viewed 24 November 2009, Format In-Text Reference Reference List Net sales in Australia for the year ending 2009 were $4,404,000.00 (Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd: Company Factfile 2010) . Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd: Company Factfile 2010, Euromonitor Global Market Information Database, viewed 20 March 2010, . Thesis Technically a thesis is not a published work, so the title is not placed in italics Under Award you might also put Masters thesis or Honours thesis Only put the location if it is not obvious from the name of the institution eg La Trobe University, Bundoora. University of Wollongong would be enough on its own Direct quote A model predictive control strategy was developed to optimise the selection of the optimal sequence of operating modes (Fiorentini 2016, p. 218) Paraphrasing Fiorentini (2016, p. 218) developed a model predictive control strategy… Fiorentini, M 2016, ‘Hybrid model predictive control of residential heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems with on-site energy generation and storage ‘, PhD thesis, University of Wollongong.

Social Science

1500 words assignment for Culture, Equity, and Diversity assignment with original information and following the instruction properly and professionally.

Additional information for Culture, Equity and Diversity assignment

 

Assignment – Close Reading and Response
Format: Length: 1500 words (plus or minus 10%)

Word (or similar) digital document.

Your document should be formatted with 1.5 line spacing.

Part A

 Do a close reading of one of the articles provided in which you identify which value positions are being taken by the author and by commentators within the article and justify your interpretation of the text.

 

Part B)

Write a letter to the editor of a newspaper to refute the arguments made in the first article and instead propose a position based on valuing difference and diversity. Here you should also refer to ideas of relationality and inclusivity.

 

Both your close reading and letter to the editor should draw on theories and ideas used throughout the semester and reading from the unit as well as some wider reading.

 

 

Assignment Instructions

Part A

  • Choose one of the articles provided for your close reading.
  • Read through the article and see if you can identify some of the issues being discussed. Make a list of them. What is the article arguing? What is the ‘story’ being told here? Notice the language used –what words come up often? How is language being used to convince the reader?
  • Research the issue to which this article relates, and make sure you have a clear understanding of the issues involved, the different ways that the media and others have approached the article. Find articles that represent other views on the issue. Make sure your understanding is well-grounded and factual, and that you’re making use of your analytical skills when finding other material on this.
  • In your research, identify some of the dominant themes, stories or ways of thinking about the main actors/identities in the article. Do these relate to a fixing, ignoring or excluding discourse? How do alternative narratives that you’ve found work to value difference? Make a note of all of these.
  • Return to your article. Go through the article to find evidence (actual words and sentences) of the dominant discourses and stories about people/places/events/communities that are present in the article. Highlight and colour code them (eg if the sentence is an example of heternormativity, use green. If it is an example of a paternalist fixing narrative, use orange etc).
  • Use these sentences to construct a close reading of the article, in which you identify the dominant discourses/stories and value positions that are being called upon to justify the argument. In your close reading, make an argument that the article is making use of particular value position/s. You should use quotes from the article to demonstrate how they are supporting your claim that the article is (for example) using fixing discourses, and you MUST explain why the sentence you use demonstrates this. Why is this sentence significant? What does it tell us about the values that underpin the article/argument? (It is not enough to simply say that the sentence shows the use of a fixing discourse without explaining how!).
  • Your close reading should make at least 4 points (ie 4 paras) that are well supported with evidence from the article as well as other sources from the unit and outside.

Part B

  • Write a letter to the editor of a newspaper to refute the arguments made in the first article and instead propose a position based on valuing difference and diversity. Here you should also refer to ideas of relationality and inclusivity.
  • Your response should address the precise claims and issues made within the initial argument and refute them based on a position of valuing difference.
  • Your response should reference material from the unit and also material from your wider research for part A. Think here about the use of reputable sources.
  • If applicable or relevant, your response may also outline a service provision model, vision or response to the issue that supports social justice/valuing diversity.

 

You MUST use references in both parts and these should be from theories and ideas used throughout the semester as well as some wider reading. You should use a minimum of 5 references.

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THE AUSTRALIAN Malcolm Turnbull’s strong words on border control appreciated by all Though Turnbull understandably says he has always supported his party’s tough approach to border security, he has in the past often given hints of equivocation, and was never as confident and self-assured as this week. In speeches to critical international audiences, he made clear the strength and distinctiveness of Australian policy. At President Barack Obama’s leaders’ summit on refugees, Turnbull broadcast a strong message to the world: “Australia’s approach is to be both principled and pragmatic. Our strategy addresses all parts of the problem — employing strong border protection policies, a very tough stance on people-smugglers, while tackling the causes of displacement, with a generous and compassionate resettlement program supporting refugees in our communities. “Strong borders are not just about security. They are crucial to ensuring social harmony and public support for migration domestically … Australia is a prime example. Securing our borders has increased public confidence and enabled Australia to have one of the world’s most generous humanitarian systems.” Turnbull is dead right. Despite all the sanctimonious blather that issues from European politics, virtually every European leader now wants what Canberra has done — re-establish control of borders. Turnbull said European leaders told him uncontrolled immigration posed an “existential threat” to their societies. May, the new British Prime Minister, has said her nation will never surrender control over who comes to Britain as refugees, and in what numbers. She has proposed the strongest policy emphasis should be placed on providing safe haven for people fleeing conflict, poverty or persecution in the first safe country they reach, and on making their countries safe for their return. This is difficult policy but there is no alternative. The most extraordinary statement came from Merkel, the German Chancellor. A few years ago she declared that multiculturalism had failed Germany. Then during last year’s surge of people from North Africa and the Middle East she said that everyone was welcome and somehow Germany would “just cope”. The result was a million irregular Muslim immigrants in Germany in one year, many, probably most, young men suffering no obvious handicap other than an overwhelming desire to live in Germany. As a direct result, Merkel’s party has been driven into a humiliating third place in two successive state elections, being beaten in both by Alternative for Germany, the first mainstream far-Right party to emerge in post-Nazi Germany. This week Merkel threw up her hands in semi-despair, wished she could turn back time to before her fateful statement, and acknowledged that the German state, her government, had “lost control” and that this was unsustainable. Here are a few facts. According to the UN there are more than 65 million displaced people. Australia will shortly increase its humanitarian and refugee intake to almost 19,000 a year. Say we more than doubled that to 40,000 and NewsFlash The Australian app Editorial Code of conduct Standards of Practice Subscription terms Group Subscription Terms Accessibility Privacy Policy Relevant Ads Opt-out Cookie Policy Terms of Use Help Contact Us info Photo Sales News Archive Contact Us About The Australian Advertise with us Our journalists Subscribe The Australian Plus member benefits Sign up to Newsletters Manage Your Newsletters About Us Copyright The Australian. All times AEST (GMT +10:00) Back to top LOG IN SUBSCRIBE Malcolm Turnbull’s strong words on border control appreciated by all http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/greg-sheridan/mal… 1 of 4 31/08/2017 3:38 PM ran the program for 1000 years we would get about two-thirds of the way through the problem. As Turnbull pointed out, and as every policymaker in the world knows, resettlement is not going to be the primary solution. And if through some miracle 65 million people were resettled into rich, Western countries, this would certainly produce a pull factor that would produce another 65 million people, or double that, seeking the same outcome. Turnbull announced several measures that are good policy in themselves and make a useful contribution internationally. First, as previously foreshadowed, our annual refugee and humanitarian program will increase to 18,750 from 2018-19 and stay at that high level. Second, we will join a US-led program to resettle refugees from Central America. And third, Canberra will provide an extra $130 million to the $220m it has already allocated to help the countries that border Syria. These are all good measures in themselves and good for Australia. They could all go further but they are reasonable steps. No issue is subject to more muddled thinking, faux moralising, unintended consequences and fact-free pronouncements than irregular people movements. One of the problems is sorting out the wildly differing categories of folks. People leave their countries for many reasons. Some are persecuted because of their identity or beliefs. These are classic refugees. They can go back home if their countries become safe. Some can never return. Many flee conflict. They too can return if their countries become safe. But many leave because of what sociologists sometimes call “positive desperation”, an understandable and overwhelming desire to leave an unsatisfactory, poor country and live in a rich one. There is nothing immoral or unethical about this. But such a desire does not of itself impose on rich countries an ethical obligation to allow everyone who arrives irregularly to stay permanently. Thus the populations on Nauru and Manus Island are not, once they have been processed, detained. On Nauru they get 10-year visas, can go wherever they like, can go to any country that will have them, can go home if they like or make their lives in Nauru. Some could be resettled in Cambodia. One reason they don’t take up such options is because the activists in Australia continue to convince them that eventually they may be able to come and live permanently in Australia. Cambodia and Nauru are very difficult societies to live in. But people resettled there would not suffer political persecution. Those on Manus can, after processing, live anywhere in Papua New Guinea, another very difficult society but not one where resettled people would suffer political persecution. Thus the central responsibility, not to return people to persecution, is met. Of course, the whole question of deciding who is a genuine refugee is extremely fraught. Under the Rudd-Gillard policies, which saw 1200 people drown at sea and 50,000 irregular arrivals at a rate that kept accelerating, people would throw away their identity documents before processing and then offer well-schooled answers to the questions to establish refugee status. The system was massively rorted. Immigration Minister Peter Dutton this week foreshadowed that even with the generous provisions for defining refugee status, perhaps a third of the 30,000 left over in Australia from Labor would not qualify as refugees. Labor’s immigration spokesman Shayne Neumann says even these people should be given permanent residency in Australia. This is one of countless indications that Labor would be incapable of maintaining secure borders. The idea of a regional solution is a complete furphy. Regional co-operation in deterrence and border control can be important, but a regional solution implies more ways to come to Australia or other rich countries, and that would attract a huge, new inflow. In Inquirer last week, my colleague Paul Kelly provided a magnificent evaluation of a new study of Australian exceptionalism, by which its authors mean our distinctive national ability, except for the great reform period for 20 years from the early 1980s, to choose poor economic policy. Malcolm Turnbull’s strong words on border control appreciated by all http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/greg-sheridan/mal… 2 of 4 31/08/2017 3:38 PM But immigration provides a reverse kind of Australian exceptionalism. From Federation onwards, governments have been able, with very few exceptions, to achieve big national goals through immigration. The White Australia policy bore the characteristic racism of its time, but it was also a dynamic social policy that was part of a determination to build a predominantly European society with a European living standard and an egalitarian ethos. After World War II, Australia’s leaders recognised the need for a much bigger population, and immigration diversified into eastern and southern Europe. This was enormously successful. In the second half of the 1960s, Harold Holt dismantled the White Australia policy. The first big influx of Asians came about as a result not of left-wing compassion but of Cold War solidarity with our anti-communist allies in South Vietnam. The first party to oppose White Australia was the anti-communist Democratic Labor Party. The other dynamic that drove Malcolm Fraser to eventually accept the Indochinese was the characteristic national desire to stop the boats, after about 2000 arrived in northern Australia. And the other factor was a desire to participate in US policy. The Indochinese are immensely successful immigrants. In 55 years we have gone from White Australia to one of the most racially diverse nations on earth. There are a million people of ethnic Chinese background and our biggest single source of immigrants in recent years has often been India. We typically run one of the biggest per capital legal immigration programs in the world. We have undergone this transformation without significant social disruption. John Howard and Tony Abbott, in two remarkable episodes of national will and agile, innovative policymaking, defeated the international people smuggling industry. Only by doing that has the continuation of exceptional Australian success been possible. Turnbull has shown himself to be the worthy heir to these historic Australian achievements. House of Reps to get extra MP GREG BROWN Under the AEC’s redistribution Victoria and the ACT gain a seat each, taking the lower house to 151, but SA loses an MP. ALP brawls over Vic candidates SAMANTHA HUTCHINSON Federal members weigh into local and federal preselection battles and put pressure on the Premier to expel a candidate. Spring to begin with a sting A record-breaking winter is finally over tomorrow but the Bureau of Meteorology’s spring outlook reveals little relief in sight. End of story? Not a chance THE MOCKER There’s a very good reason why Penny Wong wants the dual citizenship saga enveloping fellow senator Katy Gallagher to go away. A ‘rainbow Trojan horse’ RACHEL BAXENDALE Cory Bernardi voices his concerns on same-sex marriage, while Labor describes Matt Canavan’s comments as bizarre. Abbott’s history warning GREG BROWN Tony Abbott warns a government plan to teach more indigenous history must be accompanied by lessons on British history. FROM THE HOMEPAGE Malcolm Turnbull’s strong words on border control appreciated by all http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/greg-sheridan/mal… 3 of 4 31/08/2017 3:38 PM ‘We created a crater to stop IS’ NANCY A. YOUSSEF US-led warplanes have blocked a convoy of Islamic State fighters from reaching territory the group holds in east Syria. MP targeted in massage scam BRAD NORINGTON A NSW Liberal MP says he escaped a “terrifying” attempt to blackmail him after he ordered a massage in his hotel room. A NOTE ABOUT RELEVANT ADVERTISING: We collect information about the content (including ads) you use across this site and use it to make both advertising and content more relevant to you on our network and other sites. This is also known as Online Behavioural Advertising. You can find out more about our policy and your choices, including how to opt-out here Malcolm Turnbull’s strong words on border control appreciated by all http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/greg-sheridan/mal… 4 of 4 31/08/2017 3:38 PM

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CSV2108 Close Reading Assignment 2 Marking Key

Student’s name:_______________­­­­­­__________         Tutor:__________________              Date:_________                                                                                                                                                                       Mark:________/50

 

  N/Fail C/Pass CR/Credit D/Distinction HD/High Distinction
Content of assignment          
Part A: A clear and concise argument that shows a clear understanding of the value positions/discourses used by and in the newspaper article being examined.

 

No argument or no reference to value positions; incorrect or insubstantial value position used A clear argument, understanding of the value position/s the article uses and some ability to articulate how and why the article can be understood as taking these position/s

 

A clear, argument that demonstrates a good understanding of the value position/s the article takes and the ability to articulate how and why the article can be understood to take these position/s A very tight argument that demonstrates a clear understanding of the value positon/s the article takes; very good analysis of how and why the article can be read as taking these positions. Precise and clear points made that show what narratives/ideas/themes/discourses are being used to support this value position in the article. An excellent argument that includes a deep understanding of the value position/s the article is taking and an excellent analysis that clearly and precisely argues how and why the article takes these positions, and what narratives/ideas/themes/discourses are being used to support this value position in the article.
Part A: Well-chosen examples/ rhetorical evidence (actual words and sentences) from the article are used to demonstrate which value positions the newspaper article is taking, and clear explanations of how these examples support the value position.

 

No examples from the article are used to support argument; examples used are not explained; examples used are not introduced and it is unclear why they are used, poor or inappropriate examples are used.

 

Some examples from the article are used to support the assignment’s argument and an attempt has been made to explain how they support the value position/s in the article. A few examples are be poorly chosen or explanations lacking in detail.

 

Well-chosen examples from the article are used to support the assignment’s argument, are embedded into the argument, and are accompanied by an explanation of how they support/provide evidence of the value position/s used in the article Very good examples from the article are used to support the assignment’s argument; examples are well embedded into the argument, are introduced and are accompanied by a clear and accurate explanation of how they support/provide evidence of the value position/s used in the article. Excellent examples from the article are used to support the assignment’s argument; examples are very well embedded into the argument and demonstrate a deep understanding of the discourses in play in this value position. Examples are well introduced and are accompanied by a clear and nuanced explanation of how they support/provide evidence of the value position/s used in the article.
Part A: Demonstrated understanding of the topic/issue under discussion

 

 

Knowledge of the topic is unclear, biased; assignment is clearly uninformed by reading, no understanding of the issues surrounding the article. Incorrect issue identified as central topic. Assignment demonstrates some understanding of the topic/issue. Assignment demonstrates a solid understanding of the issue/topic

 

Assignment demonstrates a very good understanding of the issue/topic Assignment demonstrates a deep and insightful understanding of the topic.
Part B: A clear argument that demonstrates how this topic/issue could be approached from a valuing position.

 

 

No argument or no reference to the valuing position; incorrect or insubstantial value position used, A clear argument that demonstrates how this topic/issue can be approached from a valuing position

 

A solid argument that demonstrates well  how this topic/issue can be approached from a valuing position

 

A very good argument that demonstrates very well  how this topic/issue can be approached from a valuing position

 

An excellent argument that demonstrates clearly and thougtfully  how this topic/issue can be approached from a valuing position

 

Part B: Clear refutation of the specific arguments put forward in the newspaper article from part A and how and why they don’t support a valuing position

 

Arguments of newspaper article examined in part A are not referenced; no evidence as to why they don’t support a valuing position Letter to the editor references arguments/discourses put forward in newspaper article and refutes them, demonstrates how and why they don’t support a valuing position Letter to the editor references specific arguments/discourses put forward in newspaper article and refutes them well, demonstrates how and why they don’t support a valuing position Letter to the editor references specific arguments/discourses put forward in newspaper article and refutes them using clear evidence, demonstrates clearly how and why they don’t support a valuing position Letter to the editor references specific arguments/discourses put forward in newspaper article and refutes them using clear evidence and understanding of discursive constructions of value positions, demonstrates thoughtfully and with evidence how and why they don’t support a valuing position
Part B: A clear articulation of what it looks like to value difference in relation to this topic/issue

 

Valuing difference is not explained; valuing difference is not explained in relation to the topic at hand Letter clearly sets out how difference can be valued in relation to this issue/topic Letter clearly sets out how difference can be valued and draws on evidence and references to do so Letter clearly sets out how difference can be valued in relation to this issue and makes use of discourses/ways of thinking to argue strongly how this valuing can take place Letter clearly sets out how difference can be valued in relation to this issue/topic and demonstrates a deep understanding of the ways that discourses/ways of thinking about this issue are constructed/shaped.
Writing skills          
Clarity of writing (syntax/

Spelling)

Difficult to follow; Syntax/spelling require work Difficult to follow at times; Syntax/spelling require some work Clearly expressed; No major errors

 

Well written; no major errors; sentences flow, paragraphs usually linked Well written; very few errors;

Sentences flow, paragraphs clearly linked

Structural writing skills Difficult to follow; no clear links between paragraphs; no paragraphing; information not organized or structured Reflection  is structured; paragraphs clearly discernable; topic sentences used; too many ideas per paragraph Reflection well structured, Paragraphs well structured; clear topic sentences used; one idea per paragraph Reflection  well structured; paragraphs clearly crafted and information flows logically Very well-structured reflection; paragraphs well-crafted and information flows logically; sequence of ideas is clear and well planned; essay a pleasure to read.
Referencing/Research          
Evidence of research into topic and additional supporting reading No research into topic or research that does not demonstrate ability to ‘sift’ for reliability Some research into topic, albeit populist and/or unbalanced Evidence of balanced research into topic including reputable/peer reviewed sources Evidence of wide and balanced reading on topic, including reputable/peer reviewed sources Evidence of very wide and very balanced reading on topic, including reputable/peer reviewed sources
In-text referencing No attempt or rarely correct Attempted; some errors Mostly correct Few errors Correct
Reference List No reference list or referencing rarely correct Attempted; some errors Mostly correct Few errors Correct

 

congestive heart failure

Ineffective Breathing Pattern related to fatigue and declined lung expansion evidenced by Tachypnea( increased RR) and decreased SPO2 level(88% on RA) and altered chest excursion( van Riet et al.,2014 & Barnett, Prior, Kadam & Jordan, 2017). Justification In the CCF patients, low volume may not pump effectively which prevents body from getting enough O2 rich blood, which causes shortness of breath. It is necessary to have effective airway in patient to prevent the asosciated risk such as worsening of HTN(Scott &Jackson,2013 & Walthall, Johnson & Boulton,2017). Your essay should (with approximate word limits): Briefly introduce the case study and its significance. Give a brief background of the patient and Identify the clinical priority that will be the focus of this essay (400 words). It should be very clear to you by now that a clinical priority is a problem statement, whereas an intervention is an action taken by a healthcare provider to address a problem. Make sure you clearly outline the structure and scope of your assignment in the introduction. Critically analyse the nursing and/or collaborative interventions used to manage the patient’s clinical priority, drawing on evidence-based literature such as relevant clinical guidelines or systematic reviews (1,500 words). This means you have to critically analyse ALL the interventions that were actually performed to manage the clinical priority chosen. You may also identify others that should have been performed based on your review of the literature. Each student’s essay will be different. For example, one student may discuss 4 interventions used to manage the problem, another student may choose to discuss only one intervention in depth. The point is that it is up to you to structure your assignment based on your individual case study. Based on your critical analysis of the management of this patient, you need to conclude with some specific implications for your future nursing practice and for you personally as a graduate RN (300 words).

HLT51612 DIPLOMA OF NURSING

HLT51612 DIPLOMA OF NURSING
HLTHIR404D Work effectively with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people
Assessment One
In order to be competent in this assessment you must use your research skills to research Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and history and how these impact health and community services they receive.
Competency Grading
The four sections of this assessment and clinical placement are worth 100% for this unit.
Instructions
1. You are required to complete all of the following 4 sections of this Assessment:
Section 1: Research Report – 30 marks
Section 2: Develop Culturally Safe Work Practices – 30 marks
Section 3: Mutual Mentoring – 25 marks
Section 4: Self Reflection – 15 marks
2. You can complete Sections 1 and 2 individually or in pairs 3. If working in a pair each person must:
– Clearly identify the contribution each person has made to both sections. If this is not completed, then the assessment will be sent back for resubmission
– Submit their own copy of the assessment 4. Section 3 and 4 are to be completed individually
5. The following applies to all sections:
– Assessments can be word processed. You must use:
? Arial font
? Size 12
? 1.5 spacing
– Handwritten assessments can be submitted in either blue or black pen. Do not submit an assessment that has white out or any other form of correction fluid/tape
– Insert a footer with your name and student ID on every page of your assessment
– All work must be referenced that is not your own using the style described in the student handbook
– Create a bibliography that includes all of the researched information
– Complete an Assessment Cover Sheet and attach it to your assessment
– Submit your Assessment by the due date either to your Nurse Educator or to a member of the Administration team
Reasonable Adjustment
CTA will make reasonable adjustments at your request to this assessment before the assessment commences. Reasonable adjustment will be made as per the information provided to you in the Student Handbook. Reasonable adjustment will not apply under the following circumstances:
• Evidence of alcohol or drug misuse
• Late arrival
• Cheating
Care Training Australia, HLTHIR404D Assessment 1, Version 2.0, February 2017 Page 1 of 5
Section 1- Research Report 30 marks
Complete research and write a report.
During your research it will be beneficial to find out about the current health care services and programs that are currently available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and how they can access and engage in them. Also research the political, social and economic issues associated with these services.
When writing the report there is no word count expectation, however, it is estimated that this will be at least somewhere between 1500 – 2500 words. You may write more or less but you must thoroughly cover all of the dot points below in your own words.
Dot points to research and include in your report:
• The history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Australia
• Culture including the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures
• The importance of law and kinship – explain family structures
• Loss of land
• How culture has been lost or maintained
• Racism and discrimination – explain how the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were/are still viewed by many Australians
• Communication – identify ineffective and inappropriate communication processes and provide solutions
• Factors that have contributed to ill health in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
• Power relations – past and present and their effect on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
• The impact/issues European Settlement and modern western health care systems and structures have had on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.
• Reflect on your own culture and belief systems and how they could affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Section 2 – Develop Culturally Safe Work Practices 30 marks
Develop (make up)a workplace policy and procedure or a booklet that can be given to new nursing staff at their induction to make them aware of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples culturally safe work practices that are to comply with the workplace.
Include the following dot points that relate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people:
• The names of and how to access the following o commonwealth, and/or territory/state legislation o codes of practice o community standards and regulations o organisational policies and practices
• Interpreter services that are available
• Health and community services and programs available in Victoria
• Common cultural customs that staff need be aware of
• Appropriate communication methods you may need to use
• Ways to improve cross cultural communication and understanding in the workplace
• Ways to promote participation and engagement in culturally safe workplace practices
• How to locate other resources that staff can access to increase their understanding of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples culture and customs e.g. web sites or book titles
• Include other topics any that are relevant to the development of culturally safe work practices
e.g. something you have learned from you research
Section 3- Mutual Mentoring
Reasonable Adjustment 25 marks
CTA has been requested to make reasonable adjustments to section 3 of this assessment by Nurse Educators who raised concerns/issues on behalf of their nursing student cohorts re their ability to complete this section. These concerns/issues include:
– being unable to obtain assistance from the list of organisations provided to students, that students were advised would be able to assist them to make contact with Aboriginal and/or
Torres Strait Islander persons to discuss mutual mentoring arrangements
– Privacy and confidently concerns raised by these organisations
– Some instances where organisations did not reply to student requests for assistance
– Students found it difficult to locate Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander persons in metropolitan Melbourne who would agree to participate in a mentoring relationship with nursing students.
Reasonable adjustments have been made as per the information provided in the Student Handbook.
Student Instructions
1. Develop a Mentoring Plan
2. Begin by selecting a Mentoring Plan Template from a website or create one yourself
3. Choose a mentoring topic that you would like to discuss with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person and write them in the template
4. Create questions that are relevant to the topic and write them in the template
5. Ideally the Mentoring Plan (template) that you have created would be competed with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person, instead of this list and/or describe the ways you would communicate with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person
Before creating your questions you will need to do some research of the following organisations websites to ensure you have created questions that would not be seen as inappropriate or offensive to an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person.
• Australian Indigenous Education Foundation • Australian Indigenous Mentoring experience • Victorian Aboriginal Education Assistance Inc.
• Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages
• Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation Inc.
• Stolen Generations Victoria
• Reconciliation Australia
• Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation
• Department of Justice & Regulation, State Government of Victoria
• Aboriginal health, Department of Health and Human Services, State Government of Victoria • Supporting Aboriginal Businesses and Employment, Business Victoria • Australian Government, Department of Social Services.
Section 4 – Self reflection 15 marks
Once you have completed Sections 1 to 3, write a reflection answers to the following points:
• What you have learnt about yourself and your understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, consider what has changed in regards to your understanding of their culture, the similarities and differences that you have?
• How will you advocate for anti-racism?
• Were there any surprises. Will you change any of the behaviours you have to accommodate their culture? If yes what? If no, why not?
• How you would develop cultural competency towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and ho would encourage others to gain the same competency

: ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGERS

NIT CODE: ACT507 UNIT NAME: ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGERS
Assignment Two Information
Semester 2 2017
Assessment 40%
School of Law and Business
Semester 2, 2011 Page 1 of
Faculty of Law Business and Art
SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS.
Due Date
This assignment may be submitted at or before 12 midnight on Sunday of Study Week 13 (22 October 2017).
Lodgement
• The Assignment must include a coversheet that shows the student full name, student number, campus, and lecturer’s name. Do not use the standard CDU Assignment Cover Sheet templates.
• Assignment must be lodged online via the ACT507 Learnline Assignment Lodgement link.
• Ensure your file is named using a file naming convention that allows the lecturer to identify to whom it belongs. Failure to use an acceptable file naming convention may result in your assignment lodgement being rejected. The file name should start with the name of your campus followed by your student number (Examples: SYDN990040, MELB990040, WFD990040, EXT990040)
• DO NOT LODGE VIA EMAIL or FAX – assignments lodged by email or fax will not be accepted.
• KEEP A COPY – Ensure you have a copy of the assignment lodged. If you have submitted assessment work electronically please make sure you have a backup copy.
• It is the students’ responsibility to ensure that submission of the assignment is successful.
University Plagiarism policy
Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of material written or produced by others or a rework of your own material. All sources of information and ideas used in assignments must be referenced. This applies whether the information is from a book, journal article, the internet, or a previous essay you wrote or the assignment of a friend. For more details please refer to ACT507 Learnline site.
Late Assignments and Extensions
LATE ASSIGNMENTS WILL GENERALLY NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Exceptions will only be made where assignments are late due to special circumstances that are supported by documentary evidence, and may be subject to a penalty of 5% of assignment marks per day. Partially completed assignments will be accepted with appropriate loss of marks for the incomplete portion.
Should students foresee potential difficulties with submission of assessment items, they should contact the lecturer immediately, to discuss suitable arrangements etc for the submission of those assessment times. An Application for Assignment Extension or Special Consideration should be completed and provided to the Head of School, School of Law and Business. This application form, explanation and instructions is available on the ACT507 CDU Learnline course site.
Summary of Assignment Related Documents
The following is a summary of documents associated with and/or provided for this Assignment.
• The Assignment Requirements Document (this document)
• Assignment Data in MS Excel format
School of Law and Business
Semester 2, 2011 Page 2 of
Faculty of Law Business and Art
REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSIGNMENT TWO:
There are four parts to this assignment.
Part A – Prepare a Master Budget (30% of the assignment assessment marks)
All that is required for this part is the Budget Schedules. They can be provided in MS Word, MS Excel or PDF format.(Word count for this part is not relevant)
Wittgenstein Pty Ltd produces propellers used in the production of wind-powered electricity generating equipment. The propellers are sold to various engineering companies that produce wind generators in Australia and Europe.
• Projected sales in units for the coming four months are provided in the assignment data sheet.
The following data pertain to production policies and manufacturing specifications followed by Wittgenstein Pty Ltd. The following details are provided in the assignment data sheet • Finished goods inventory on January 1.
• The full absorption cost of the opening finished goods inventory.
• The variable manufacturing cost of the opening finished goods inventory.
• The desired finished goods ending inventory for each month.
• The data on materials used.
• The amount of materials to be on hand at the beginning of the month
• This stipulated amount of materials to be on hand at the beginning of the month is exactly the amount of material on hand on January 1. (Assume that the material costs are the same as current quarter’s production.)
• The direct labour used per unit of output.
• The average direct labour cost per hour.
Details of the Overheads for each month are provided in the data list. The Overheads are estimated using a flexible budget formula. (Activity is measured in direct labour hours.) You will have to determine the Maintenance cost and relevant statistical data necessary for you to do so is provided in the data List
Monthly selling and administrative overhead expenses are also estimated using a flexible budgeting formula. (Activity is measured in units sold.) Finance charges and bad debts are included in the figures provided and do not need to be identified separately in the selling and administrative overhead expenses. Details are provided in the data list.
Other information provided the assignment data list are:
• The unit selling price of the propeller.
• The cost of land to be purchased in February. The company plans to purchase the land for future expansion.
• The value and timing of dividends paid to shareholders.
• Sales are on credit and the cash receipts pattern for each month is provided, as is the level of Accounts Receivable as at January 1.
• The payment for labour and purchases of materials and other costs are for cash and paid for in the month of acquisition. There is no Accounts Payable amount for this assignment.
• The cash balance on January 1.
If the firm develops a cash shortage by the end of the month, sufficient cash is borrowed to cover the shortage (including any interest payments due). Any cash borrowed is repaid one month later, as is the interest due. The annual interest rate is provided with the assignment data.
Required:
Prepare an operating budget for the first quarter (showing each month and totals for the quarter) with the following schedules: a. Sales budget
b. Production budget
c. Direct materials purchases budget
d. Direct labour budget
e. Manufacturing Overhead budget
f. Ending finished goods inventory budget
g. Cost of goods sold budget
h. Budgeted income statement (ignore income taxes and GST)
i. Cash budget
Note that whilst the Selling and Administration expenses must be included, there is no requirement to provide a Selling and Administration Expense budget schedule.
School of Law and Business
Semester 2, 2011 Page 3 of
Part B – Report on the impact of Cost Structures (20% of the assignment assessment marks)
You are required to provide a report of approx 500 words or less (excluding attachments and references), accompanied by relevant calculations, in MS Word, MS Excel and/or PDF format (or combination). Using a Report style is recommended but not compulsory.
Rita Arthurs, the sales manager is discussing the possible outcome of the forthcoming election with Paulo Farmer, the production manager. She noted that if one of the major political parties wins the election and forms government, there is a strong possibility that alternative energy sources such as wind-generated electricity may no longer be as actively supported by the new government as is the case under the current government. Rita’s primary concern is that the current market for alternative power generation equipment is already volatile and subject to significant uncertainty. Paulo is also concerned about his plans to build the new highly automated manufacturing facility on the land to be purchased in February. This new manufacturing facility will enable him to manufacture, in-house, the major two parts he is now purchasing for assembly and to significantly automate the assembly process that is currently somewhat labour intensive. His projections for the new facility indicate a reduction in direct material and direct labour costs of 25% but that his fixed manufacturing overheads are likely to increase by 50%due to the increased investment in production capacity.
Required:
Write a brief report addressing Rita’s concerns, using some of the concepts covered in chapters (15, 16, 17, 20, 22, 23) in this unit, AND the information provided from the completion of Part A of this assignment, and any additional calculations using the existing data that you feel are relevant. Your report should also include a discussion of the impact of Paulo’s intended investment in new manufacturing capacity. Support your report with relevant calculations.
Note that you should restrict your report to those concepts specifically covered in chapters 16, 17, 20 and more generally in chapters 22 and 23 , and not discuss the current political situation, environmental issues, or the marketing of alternate energy sources etc. or other interesting but otherwise irrelevant issues.
Part C – Report on the Budgeted versus Actual Outcomes (20% of the assignment assessment marks)
You are required to provide a report of approx 500 words or less (excluding attachments and references), accompanied by relevant calculations, in MS Word, MS Excel and/or PDF format (or combination). Using a Report style is recommended but not compulsory.
At the end of the budgeting period, Paulo Farmer, the production manager is reviewing the actual outcomes (in particular the direct materials and direct labour) and comparing these to the budget that was originally produced (in Part A).
The following data related to the actual results recorded after the end of the quarter by Wittgenstein Pty Ltd, and are provided in the assignment data sheet:
• Actual Sales Volume for the quarter.
• The actual volume of direct materials used during the quarter (for each part).
• The actual cost of the direct materials used during the quarter (for each part).
• The actual direct labour hours used during the quarter.
• The actual cost of direct labour used during the quarter.
Paulo is confused by the outcomes. He is aware that the budget that was created before the start of the quarter was a well-considered and constructed estimate, and he did not expect that the actual outcomes would be exactly as forecast. However he is finding it difficult to understand the reasons for the differences.
Required:
Prepare a brief report to assist Paulo determine what might have caused the differences between the original budget and the final actual outcomes. Speculations of the causes are sufficient, provided they are supported by relevant calculations taken from the data provided, and the budget produced in Part A,. These calculations should be included in, and referred to, in your report. Restrict your discussion to the changes related to direct materials and direct labour. As Paulo is aware that budget estimates may be inaccurate at the time of budget preparation, do not include this particular cause of difference in your report.
School of Law and Business
Semester 2, 2011 Page 4 of
Faculty of Law Business and Arts ACT507-assignment2-sem022017.docx7
Part D – Discussion on Participative Budgeting (20% of the assignment assessment marks)
You are required to provide an essay or report of approx 500 words or less (excluding attachments and references), accompanied by
relevant calculations, in MS Word orPDF format. The style of your essay or report is not important provided your ideas, arguments and/or
3 recommendations etc are clear and understandable and properly referenced using a accepted reference technique
An effective budget converts the goals and objectives of an organization into data. The budget serves as a blueprint for management’s plans. The budget is also the basis for control. Management performance can be evaluated by comparing actual results with the budget.
Thus, creating the budget is essential for the successful operation of an organization.
Finding the resources to implement the budget – that is, moving from a starting point to the ultimate goal – requires the extensive use of human resources. How managers perceive their roles in the process of budgeting is important to the successful use of the budget as an effective tool for planning, communicating, and controlling.
Required:
Discuss the behavioural implications of planning and control when a company’s management employs:
i. An imposed budgetary approach
ii. A participative budgetary approach
Illustrate your discussion with reference to your report to Paulo Farmer in Part C, discussing how Paulo might respond to the various outcomes of Part C if the budget had been imposed and contrast that with how he might respond (if differently) had the budget been prepared using a participative budgetary approach.
Assignment Preparation and Presentation (10% of the assignment assessment marks)
You are required to present and lodge your assignment in a manner that complies with the requirements set out in the Assignment Details and on Learnline. Requirements would include such elements as layout, grammar, referencing, and various lodgement details. Reports should be easy to read and understand, demonstrating good writing skills.
A word limit has been suggested for parts B, C and D The suggested length is provided so that you can gauge the extent of the work required. Marks will not be deducted if you exceed the recommended length, however essays that significantly exceed the recommended length will not be given any additional marks. A concise clear answer will attract more marks than a long rambling one.
3Any generally accepted referencing technique is acceptable however it should be used consistently throughout your paper
School of Law and Business
Semester 2, 2011 Page 5 of
Faculty of Law Business and Arts ACT507-assignment2-sem022017.docx7

GSBS6040 EXAMINATION QUESTION BANK

GSBS6040 EXAMINATION QUESTION BANK
TRIMESTER 3. 2017
• There are eighteen questions in this Examination Question Bank covering topics 1 to 9.
• Six of these questions will be on the examination paper.
• Students will be required to answer four of the six questions.
• Students will not be informed beforehand which six questions will be on the paper.
• Each question has equal weighting—that is, each answer will be awarded a maximum of 10 marks, for a total of 40 marks.
• The examination will be two hours in duration, with 10 minutes reading time.
• Students are encouraged to use these questions to help them review and apply the course content.
• Required readings from the textbook, and the additional required readings, are all examinable content. Also, use examples from class discussion to illustrate answers in the examination.
TOPIC 1 – DEFINITIONS, VALUES AND ASSUMPTIONS
1. A unitarist approach to management implies that people in organisations are capable of being ‘of one mind’ and a business manager’s role will be about finding or specifying common purposes in the interests of all. Discuss.
2. HRM has been transformed from the former personnel management model. What changes have been necessary to bring about this transformation? Explain the roles that a contemporary human resource managers must play.
TOPIC 2 – LINKING TO STRATEGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3. A normative business model does not describe a situation or structure that exists in an enterprise. Rather, it is a plan that an enterprise utilises to improve its operations. Rather than simply stating how a particular enterprise works, a normative business model prescribes structures and practices for the business. The Harvard Model of HRM and other such models are often criticised as normative. Discuss.
4. Provide three examples of how specific human resource management (HRM) practices would differ if an organisation changed from a growth to a decline strategy.
TOPIC 3 – HRM RULES, ROLES AND FUNCTIONS
5. The direct handling of people is, and always has been, an integral part of every business manager’s responsibility. What roles should HRM play in today’s modern organisation?
6. Why are rules about the rights and accountabilities of managers and employees at work important? Include in your answer an outline of the different types of rules with examples.
TOPIC 4 – HR PLANNING, WORK AND JOB DESIGN
7. Why is the need for human resource planning so important in today’s business environment? Explain the relationship between job analysis, individual competency development and job design.
8. Explain the concept of the psychological contract. Why is this concept so important in modern business organisations?
TOPIC 5 – RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION
9. The War for Talent means that, when recruiting, managers of organisations will scout for employee ‘talent’ in the ‘global village’. From the perspective of the resource-based view (RBV) of organisations, explain why managers might prefer to employ existing employees in new jobs as they arise, rather than employing from outside.
10. A number of writers have debated the ‘high road’ versus the ‘low road’ approach to HRM. How could such concepts impact on recruitment and selection processes? How do these approaches relate to the business life cycle?
TOPIC 6 – PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT
11. Should companies be interested in helping employees plan their careers? Are there potential corporate benefits to be gained? Do individuals also have a role to play in planning their career? Discuss.
12. Despite the fact that most large organisations have some form of performance review system, many critics say that these systems do not work. Explain how an effective performance review system can be used as a tool for measuring and improving employees’ performance through mutual setting of goals and objectives.
TOPIC 7 – PAY AND REWARDS
13. ‘The design and development of a strategic remuneration system — one that fits with an organisation’s strategic plan and direction — is a complex and challenging task.’ Evaluate this comment.
14. Equity theory may play a very large role in determining an individual’s perception of an organisation’s remuneration and reward system. Procedural fairness and distributive justice are related concepts. Explain and discuss this view.
TOPIC 8 – EQUITY, DIVERSITY, HEALTH AND SAFETY and WELLNESS
15. All industries have different kinds of safety risks and health issues, depending on the nature of the workers, the work and the environment. Explain actions that an HR manager might take to effectively develop a workplace safety and health culture.
16. What is the meant by the terms ‘glass ceiling’ and ‘sticky floor’? What may be the consequences where a glass ceiling or sticky floor is perceived to exist within an organisation? Can human resource development strategies help to address these issues? Explain.
TOPIC 9 – EMPLOYEE VOICE AND REPRESENTATION
17. In a pluralist society, employee voice is essential to ensure improved organisational performance. Evaluate this claim.
18. Describe and evaluate at least three mechanisms through which workers express their voice at the workplace, either individually or collectively. What would be the benefits and challenges that organisations may encounter in responding effectively to employee voice? Support your answers with examples.

Structural Lab report

Requirement Page- Structural Lab report
Sample lab report is given to you, the values, tables, and pictures need not be changed. The only change required is the theory which basically needs paraphrasing.
Regarding the Formulas, they must be the same but if we change the style of writing then, plagiarism will not be a problem.
Paraphrasing must be done in such a way that the content should be same, and the technical words should also be same, therefore, a person with good structural knowledge should write.
2 different reports are needed. Therefore, price quoted should be for 2 reports.
*** note last time when the paraphrasing was done the Expert did paraphrase the report but made no sense in terms of an engineering report, due to which the report, submitted gained less marks***

Reports must be uploaded to Moodlebefore Noon on Tuesday week 12

Marks Allocated?25%
Word Limit ??2500 words
Due Date?Reports must be uploaded to Moodlebefore Noon on Tuesday week 12
What you are required to do;
Based on the feedback received on your Situation Analysis Report you will now proceed to a Final Strategic Recommendation for your chosen company in which you will be required to detail not only what your strategic recommendations are but also what specific steps at the business and corporate level are necessary to implement those strategies as well as how you will monitor and control the performance of the company as it goes forward.
You will incorporate in your report those parts of your Situation Analysis as are appropriate to produce a full strategic report. This will mean that you may cut and paste from your initial report and Turnitin Similarity levels will be adjusted to accommodate this.
The structure of your report headings will be
• Executive Summary
• Market Size & Trends
• Financial and Corporate Performance
• Strategic Options
• Final Recommended Strategy
• Implementation of Final Strategy
• Monitoring and Control of Future Performance