While language of mandated-reporter statutes across the country varies by stat

 While language of mandated-reporter statutes across the country varies by state, the essence is consistent. As a mandated reporter, a school counselor must make a report if there is suspicion of abuse, neglect, self-harm, or harm to others. One significant difference is to whom the school counselor reports suspicion of abuse, neglect, or harm. 
It is vital that school counselors in training understand their state laws. Identifying the issue and directing the family to resources are only the first part of the response. Eventually, a student will return to school, and a school counselor plays a vital role in that process. The effects of a crisis, disaster, or trauma can have particular long-term implications for diverse students; therefore, school counselors must be mindful of multicultural considerations in their responses to risk assessment.
This assignment meets CACREP 2016 Standards 2. F 3g, 2. F 5k, 2. F 5l, 2 F. 7c, and School Counseling Standard SC. 2i, SC 3l.
Assignment Directions
Based on the unit readings, the two media resources, and the laws of your state, explain your understanding of suicide risk assessment, trauma identification, and awareness of the signs and symptoms of substance abuse as well as indications of exposure to others’ substance abuse at home.

Identify the assessment strategies used in the video and discuss what additional questions should be asked in a risk assessment for suicide, trauma, or for signs of living in a home where substance abuse occurs.
Identify the level of risk you assigned to Jana, your thoughts on the feedback presented in the media resource Suicide Risk Assessment Response, and the action you would take based on your state law.

Next, examine intervention strategies for connecting a family to community resources, reintegrating a student to school, and collaborating with key stakeholders to ensure a successful transition. Assume the role of the school counselor in this scenario and complete the following:

Outline specific strategies to promote the family’s understanding of and access to community resources.
Discuss strategies to help Jana integrate back into school when she returns from treatment.
Discuss how to collaborate with specific stakeholders in the school who can facilitate a successful transition.

Knowing that crisis or trauma can have specific, lasting implications for diverse people, it is important to consider the aforementioned steps from a multicultural perspective. For the next part, choose an ethnicity other than your own and different from the one presented in the video. Then, examine risk assessment from a multicultural perspective, addressing potential long-term effects, identifying potential barriers, and recommending strategies for overcoming them.

Describe in detail how this assessment would differ when assessing the level of risk of a student of color. Be specific in the questions you would ask and the evaluation of the risk level. 
Explain how you would work with the family. What challenges or barriers do you anticipate and how would you overcome them? 
Examine what specific concerns a school counselor should address regarding the long-term effects of the crisis on someone with this ethnic background.

Refer to the Suicide Risk Assessment Scoring Guide for the grading criteria for this assignment.
Submission Requirements

Written communication: Written communication is free of errors that detract from the overall message.
APA: Resources and citations are formatted according to current APA guidelines.
Format: All assignments must be submitted in one of the three acceptable formats: DOC, DOCX, or PDF.
Resources: Use a minimum of 5 scholarly articles.
Length: 3–5 double-spaced, typed pages.
Font and font size: Times New Roman, 12 point.

_____

 “Key Stakeholders and Interaction in E-Learning”  Please respond to the followi

 “Key Stakeholders and Interaction in E-Learning”  Please respond to the following:

Describe the roles of four key stakeholders in an e-Learning environment, namely students, instructors, administrators, and technical support staff, and the challenges and leadership roles they face and play.  
List and discuss at least three factors that affect interaction among students and between students and the instructor in an e-Learning class.

The members of the United Nations appreciated the content you provided on popula

The members of the United Nations appreciated the content you provided on population growth. Now they are asking you to expand the whitepaper to include global food security as it relates to population growth and poverty. Read the Case Study and provide an assessment based on the questions below.(For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.)
Overview
We can view global food security as the effort to build food systems that can feed everyone, everywhere, and every day by improving food quality and promoting nutritional agriculture.[1] That said, there are certain practices that can advance this project:

Identifying the underlying causes of hunger and malnutrition
Investing in country-specific recovery plans
Strengthening strategic coordination with institutions like the UN and the World Bank
Developed countries making sustained financial commitments to the success of the project

We must bear in mind that more than three billion people, nearly one-half of the global population, subsist on as little as $2.50 a day and that nearly 1.5 billion are living in extreme poverty on less than $1.25 a day. According to the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and other relief agencies, about 20,000 people (mostly children) starve to death in the world every day, for a total of about seven million people a year.
In addition, about 750 million (twice the population of the United States) do not have access to clean drinking water, meaning that some one million people die every year from diarrhea caused by water-borne diseases.
The population of Earth is expected to grow from 7 billion in 2010 to 8 billion in 2025, 9 billion in 2040, and 11 billion by the end of the 21st century.[2] If the demand for food is predicted to grow by 50% by 2030 and 70% by 2050, the real problem is not necessarily growing that much food. Rather, it is making that amount available to people.
Moreover, foodborne illnesses are prevalent, with nearly 600 million reported cases of foodborne diseases each year. These affect mainly children, but also negatively impact the livelihood of farmers, vendors, trade associations and, ultimately, the Gross Domestic Product (national income) of a country. These issues can impose tremendous human, economic, social, and fiscal costs on countries Addressing them allows governments to devote more resources to making desperately needed improvements in infrastructure that raise the quality of life for everyone.
It is not enough to have adequate supplies of food available. Policies that focus exclusively on food production can exacerbate the problem, particularly if, to satisfy the need for quantity, the quality of the food is left wanting.
Reasons for Food Insecurity
Certainly, poverty and the systemic internal conditions creating it inside a country are the unmistakable driving factors behind keeping adequate food resources from reaching people. It is only one factor of several, however. Others include the following:
Inadequate Food Distribution: The reality is that there is more than enough food in the world to feed its people. The primary cause of famines is not poor weather conditions as much as it is getting the needed amount of food to the people who need it most. Quite often causes result from political instability and poor infrastructure, often involving a country’s port facilities, transportation availability and quality of road networks. Paradoxically, although the population is going to increase in the coming decades, the amount of food potentially available will increase along with it. This is due mostly to advances in bio agricultural engineering and increased seed immunity to molds.
Writing in the late 18th century, Thomas Malthus warned that global population would exceed the capacity of Earth to grow food, in that while population would grow exponentially, food production would grow only arithmetically. Although this theory has been proven invalid, the unfortunate result of its propagation has been for some governments to rationalize political choices that avoid helping the poverty-ridden and starving.
Political-Agricultural Practices: The widespread use of microbiological, chemical, and other forms of pesticides in food continues to be a serious issue throughout the global food chain. Widespread use of fertilizers also causes illness in millions of people every year, not only from the food itself, but from run-off into streams and rivers, contaminating entire water supplies. The human, social, and economic costs of such practices impede improvements being made not only in the raising of crops, but in their distribution. Added to this, the rising demand in developed countries for biofuels, currently refined mostly from corn and soy beans, reduces the amount of arable land devoted to producing food.
The failure of many farmers in the developing world to rotate their crops harms the replenishing of nutrients necessary to continue growing crops. In addition, the repeated use of agricultural land without allowing it to lie fallow in order to replenish needed soil nutrients thereby increasing fertility and maximizing crop yield results in reduced agricultural output and insufficient crop yields.
Economic Issues: The fact is, government policies that focus on growing cash crops, for example, are designed solely to export them to earn foreign exchange. This may be fine for the government in its efforts to earn money, but the result is that farmers end up growing for foreign markets and not domestic ones. This leads to shortages of necessary staples. Consequently, the poorest of the population are frozen out of the local markets because they cannot afford the food that remains to be sold.[3]
Civil Strife: Civil war can interrupt the flow of food from gathering depots, such as ports, to distribution centers where it can be handed out to people. During the 1990s, Somalia was particularly hard hit by their civil war, as clans fought for control of the main port at Mogadishu. This affected the flow of food to the rest of the population. In this case, as with many civil wars, whoever controls the supply of food controls the country. In failed and failing states like Zimbabwe, Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, South Sudan, Yemen, and Libya, food very often is another weapon used by one segment of the population against another.
II. Case Assessment
The issue is not the lack of food in the world, but the access to food. Simply put, food is not getting to where it needs to be in time. In developing countries, the food shortage is due to governmental control over food. These governments maintain their control and preference for certain groups by limiting access of nutritious food to certain other groups. The result is the weaponizing of food.
In this second part of your whitepaper, research the impact of poverty on global food security and the technology available potentially to remedy this situation. Write a minimum of four pages assessing the impact, citing at least five credible sources in your research. Refer specifically to the role these issues have had in the developing country of your choice. In this assessment, please include:

A cover page with your name, title of the course, date, and the name of your instructor
A one-half page introduction
A middle section that is numbered and divided into three one-page sections. Each of these sections should answer one of the following questions:

What is food insecurity and what role does population growth play in it?
What factors specifically interrupt the flow of food from the source to the people in the developing country you selected?
What forms of technology can be used to reduce hunger and improve food security? Explain how these technical solutions can do that.

A one-half page conclusion
Cite at least five credible sources excluding Wikipedia, dictionaries, and encyclopedias for your assessment.
For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.

Final Project You are tasked with creating two campaign communications messages

Final ProjectYou are tasked with creating two campaign communications messages for two targeted population groups (as specified below). We encourage you to research prior and existing campaigns on your selected topic. You cannot use, copy, or revise any existing campaign materials for your submission. This work must be solely of your own creation. Follow the steps to build your target audience and select two appropriate communication strategies in which to convey your message.

Select one health campaign from this list:

Stop Smoking Campaign
Immunization Clinic
Texting and Driving
Impaired (alcohol/drugs) Driving
Bullying (any type – cyber or face-to-face)
Domestic Violence
Injury Prevention
Food Safety
Oral Health
Needle Exchange

Select two different populations from this list:

Elderly (65+)
Youth (13-18)
Children (under 12)
Young Adult (19-35)
Adults (36-64)

Select one ethnic group for each population (a total of two – can be the same ethnic group for both populations)

Black/African American
Native American/Alaskan
Pacific Islander
Caucasian
Hispanic

Select one geographic region for each population (can be the same region for both populations)

Urban
Rural

Choose two formats from the list below and create one health message in each format for a total of two messages:

Brochure
Radio PSA
TV PSA
Flyer/Poster
Billboard/Banner
Mass Mailing (Postcards, letters, etc.)
Door Hangers

In order to explain your two communications pieces, write a 2-4 page paper (1-2 pages per campaign) with the following information for each piece:

Identify your population, demographics, campaign
Explain the appropriateness of the message you selected for your target population, including the elements of health literacy discussed in this course
Present information on the appropriateness of your selected communication strategies
Compare and contrast the two communication strategies
Copy and paste your Project Table at the end of your paper

Submission Requirements for the Final Project:

Your paper must be 2-4 pages and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.
Title page must include

Title of paper
Student’s name
Course name and number
Instructor’s name
Date submitted

Must use a minimum of two scholarly sources (other than the textbook)

  While language of mandated-reporter statutes across the country varies by stat

 While language of mandated-reporter statutes across the country varies by state, the essence is consistent. As a mandated reporter, a school counselor must make a report if there is suspicion of abuse, neglect, self-harm, or harm to others. One significant difference is to whom the school counselor reports suspicion of abuse, neglect, or harm. 
It is vital that school counselors in training understand their state laws. Identifying the issue and directing the family to resources are only the first part of the response. Eventually, a student will return to school, and a school counselor plays a vital role in that process. The effects of a crisis, disaster, or trauma can have particular long-term implications for diverse students; therefore, school counselors must be mindful of multicultural considerations in their responses to risk assessment.
This assignment meets CACREP 2016 Standards 2. F 3g, 2. F 5k, 2. F 5l, 2 F. 7c, and School Counseling Standard SC. 2i, SC 3l.
Assignment Directions
Based on the unit readings, the two media resources, and the laws of your state, explain your understanding of suicide risk assessment, trauma identification, and awareness of the signs and symptoms of substance abuse as well as indications of exposure to others’ substance abuse at home.

Identify the assessment strategies used in the video and discuss what additional questions should be asked in a risk assessment for suicide, trauma, or for signs of living in a home where substance abuse occurs.
Identify the level of risk you assigned to Jana, your thoughts on the feedback presented in the media resource Suicide Risk Assessment Response, and the action you would take based on your state law.

Next, examine intervention strategies for connecting a family to community resources, reintegrating a student to school, and collaborating with key stakeholders to ensure a successful transition. Assume the role of the school counselor in this scenario and complete the following:

Outline specific strategies to promote the family’s understanding of and access to community resources.
Discuss strategies to help Jana integrate back into school when she returns from treatment.
Discuss how to collaborate with specific stakeholders in the school who can facilitate a successful transition.

Knowing that crisis or trauma can have specific, lasting implications for diverse people, it is important to consider the aforementioned steps from a multicultural perspective. For the next part, choose an ethnicity other than your own and different from the one presented in the video. Then, examine risk assessment from a multicultural perspective, addressing potential long-term effects, identifying potential barriers, and recommending strategies for overcoming them.

Describe in detail how this assessment would differ when assessing the level of risk of a student of color. Be specific in the questions you would ask and the evaluation of the risk level. 
Explain how you would work with the family. What challenges or barriers do you anticipate and how would you overcome them? 
Examine what specific concerns a school counselor should address regarding the long-term effects of the crisis on someone with this ethnic background.

Refer to the Suicide Risk Assessment Scoring Guide for the grading criteria for this assignment.
Submission Requirements

Written communication: Written communication is free of errors that detract from the overall message.
APA: Resources and citations are formatted according to current APA guidelines.
Format: All assignments must be submitted in one of the three acceptable formats: DOC, DOCX, or PDF.
Resources: Use a minimum of 5 scholarly articles.
Length: 3–5 double-spaced, typed pages.
Font and font size: Times New Roman, 12 point.

_____

 “Key Stakeholders and Interaction in E-Learning”  Please respond to the followi

 “Key Stakeholders and Interaction in E-Learning”  Please respond to the following:

Describe the roles of four key stakeholders in an e-Learning environment, namely students, instructors, administrators, and technical support staff, and the challenges and leadership roles they face and play.  
List and discuss at least three factors that affect interaction among students and between students and the instructor in an e-Learning class.

The members of the United Nations appreciated the content you provided on popula

The members of the United Nations appreciated the content you provided on population growth. Now they are asking you to expand the whitepaper to include global food security as it relates to population growth and poverty. Read the Case Study and provide an assessment based on the questions below.(For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.)
Overview
We can view global food security as the effort to build food systems that can feed everyone, everywhere, and every day by improving food quality and promoting nutritional agriculture.[1] That said, there are certain practices that can advance this project:

Identifying the underlying causes of hunger and malnutrition
Investing in country-specific recovery plans
Strengthening strategic coordination with institutions like the UN and the World Bank
Developed countries making sustained financial commitments to the success of the project

We must bear in mind that more than three billion people, nearly one-half of the global population, subsist on as little as $2.50 a day and that nearly 1.5 billion are living in extreme poverty on less than $1.25 a day. According to the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and other relief agencies, about 20,000 people (mostly children) starve to death in the world every day, for a total of about seven million people a year.
In addition, about 750 million (twice the population of the United States) do not have access to clean drinking water, meaning that some one million people die every year from diarrhea caused by water-borne diseases.
The population of Earth is expected to grow from 7 billion in 2010 to 8 billion in 2025, 9 billion in 2040, and 11 billion by the end of the 21st century.[2] If the demand for food is predicted to grow by 50% by 2030 and 70% by 2050, the real problem is not necessarily growing that much food. Rather, it is making that amount available to people.
Moreover, foodborne illnesses are prevalent, with nearly 600 million reported cases of foodborne diseases each year. These affect mainly children, but also negatively impact the livelihood of farmers, vendors, trade associations and, ultimately, the Gross Domestic Product (national income) of a country. These issues can impose tremendous human, economic, social, and fiscal costs on countries Addressing them allows governments to devote more resources to making desperately needed improvements in infrastructure that raise the quality of life for everyone.
It is not enough to have adequate supplies of food available. Policies that focus exclusively on food production can exacerbate the problem, particularly if, to satisfy the need for quantity, the quality of the food is left wanting.
Reasons for Food Insecurity
Certainly, poverty and the systemic internal conditions creating it inside a country are the unmistakable driving factors behind keeping adequate food resources from reaching people. It is only one factor of several, however. Others include the following:
Inadequate Food Distribution: The reality is that there is more than enough food in the world to feed its people. The primary cause of famines is not poor weather conditions as much as it is getting the needed amount of food to the people who need it most. Quite often causes result from political instability and poor infrastructure, often involving a country’s port facilities, transportation availability and quality of road networks. Paradoxically, although the population is going to increase in the coming decades, the amount of food potentially available will increase along with it. This is due mostly to advances in bio agricultural engineering and increased seed immunity to molds.
Writing in the late 18th century, Thomas Malthus warned that global population would exceed the capacity of Earth to grow food, in that while population would grow exponentially, food production would grow only arithmetically. Although this theory has been proven invalid, the unfortunate result of its propagation has been for some governments to rationalize political choices that avoid helping the poverty-ridden and starving.
Political-Agricultural Practices: The widespread use of microbiological, chemical, and other forms of pesticides in food continues to be a serious issue throughout the global food chain. Widespread use of fertilizers also causes illness in millions of people every year, not only from the food itself, but from run-off into streams and rivers, contaminating entire water supplies. The human, social, and economic costs of such practices impede improvements being made not only in the raising of crops, but in their distribution. Added to this, the rising demand in developed countries for biofuels, currently refined mostly from corn and soy beans, reduces the amount of arable land devoted to producing food.
The failure of many farmers in the developing world to rotate their crops harms the replenishing of nutrients necessary to continue growing crops. In addition, the repeated use of agricultural land without allowing it to lie fallow in order to replenish needed soil nutrients thereby increasing fertility and maximizing crop yield results in reduced agricultural output and insufficient crop yields.
Economic Issues: The fact is, government policies that focus on growing cash crops, for example, are designed solely to export them to earn foreign exchange. This may be fine for the government in its efforts to earn money, but the result is that farmers end up growing for foreign markets and not domestic ones. This leads to shortages of necessary staples. Consequently, the poorest of the population are frozen out of the local markets because they cannot afford the food that remains to be sold.[3]
Civil Strife: Civil war can interrupt the flow of food from gathering depots, such as ports, to distribution centers where it can be handed out to people. During the 1990s, Somalia was particularly hard hit by their civil war, as clans fought for control of the main port at Mogadishu. This affected the flow of food to the rest of the population. In this case, as with many civil wars, whoever controls the supply of food controls the country. In failed and failing states like Zimbabwe, Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, South Sudan, Yemen, and Libya, food very often is another weapon used by one segment of the population against another.
II. Case Assessment
The issue is not the lack of food in the world, but the access to food. Simply put, food is not getting to where it needs to be in time. In developing countries, the food shortage is due to governmental control over food. These governments maintain their control and preference for certain groups by limiting access of nutritious food to certain other groups. The result is the weaponizing of food.
In this second part of your whitepaper, research the impact of poverty on global food security and the technology available potentially to remedy this situation. Write a minimum of four pages assessing the impact, citing at least five credible sources in your research. Refer specifically to the role these issues have had in the developing country of your choice. In this assessment, please include:

A cover page with your name, title of the course, date, and the name of your instructor
A one-half page introduction
A middle section that is numbered and divided into three one-page sections. Each of these sections should answer one of the following questions:

What is food insecurity and what role does population growth play in it?
What factors specifically interrupt the flow of food from the source to the people in the developing country you selected?
What forms of technology can be used to reduce hunger and improve food security? Explain how these technical solutions can do that.

A one-half page conclusion
Cite at least five credible sources excluding Wikipedia, dictionaries, and encyclopedias for your assessment.
For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.